Bedford Hill Family Practice

120 Bedford Hill
Balham
SW12 9HS
Tel: 020 8673 1720

Family Planning

All doctors are able to offer family planning advice during their normal surgery. Oral contraceptives: Please make an appointment with a practice nurse (or a GP).

  • Coils: Fitted at the Family Planning Clinic
  • Contraceptive implants: We do not fit these at the surgery and will ask you to attend the Family Planning Clinic at Balham Health Centre.
  • Contraceptive injections: Are administered by the practice nurses.
  • Emergency Contraception: Please contact a practice nurse (or a GP) as soon as possible.

The Family Planning Clinic at Balham Health Centre is held on the following days:

Tuesday 6.00pm - 8.00pm
Thursday 9.30am - 11.30am
Friday 5.00pm - 7.00pm

 

 

NHS Choices - Behind the headlines

  • Social care reforms announced

    Most of the UK media is covering the announcement made in Parliament by Jeremy Hunt, Secretary of State for Health, about proposed changes to social care.

    The two confirmed points to have garnered the most media attention in the run-up to the announcement are:

    • a ‘cost cap’ of £75,000 worth of care costs – after this...
  • Breastfeeding voucher scheme 'shows promise'

    "Initial results of a controversial scheme offering shopping vouchers to persuade mothers to breastfeed have shown promise," BBC News reports.

    The scheme, which has attracted controversy since it was announced, aimed to tackle the problem of low rates of breastfeeding in the UK compared with other developed nations. Mothers...

  • Air dryers 'blown away' by paper towels in germ tests

    "Hand dryers 'splatter' users with bacteria," The Daily Telegraph reports.

    The headline is prompted by an experimental study that compared the potential transfer of germs to the surrounding environment, users and bystanders when using three methods of hand drying:

    • paper towels
    • warm air dryers...
  • Cancer guidelines may improve diagnosis rates

    “Doctors to get more help to spot cancer early,” The Guardian reports. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has produced new revised draft guidelines that may help GPs pick up on possible early warning signs of cancer. 

    The aim of the draft...

  • Is growth in ADHD 'caused by marketing'?

    "The global surge in ADHD [attention deficit hyperactivity disorder] diagnosis has more to do with marketing than medicine, according to experts," the Mail Online reports.

    But these experts are sociologists, not clinicians, and they present no new peer-reviewed clinical evidence.

    That said, they do highlight some...

  • Have antibiotic changes upped heart infections?

    "Rates of a deadly heart infection have increased after guidelines advised against giving antibiotics to prevent it in patients at risk," BBC News reports. But there is no evidence of a direct link between the two.

    In 2008, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) produced ...

  • Report links obesity to advanced prostate cancer

    "Being overweight raises risk of men developing aggressive prostate cancer," The Guardian reports.

    A major new report from the World Cancer Research Fund has found strong evidence obesity increases the risk of aggressive...

  • Does being poor make your teeth fall out?

    "People with lower income end up with eight fewer teeth than the rich," The Independent reports.

    The headline is prompted by a new study based on a 2009 national dental health survey of adults over the age of 21 in England. It found strong links between socioeconomic status (how well off a person is) and oral health.

    ...
  • Triclosan soap linked to mouse liver cancers

    “A chemical ingredient of cosmetics, soaps, detergents, shampoos and toothpaste has been found to trigger liver cancer,” reports The Independent. The chemical in question, triclosan, is used in many products as an antibacterial.

    Should you be worried if you have just washed your hands? Probably not. The link was found in mice, not...

  • 'Food environment' needs changing, doctors argue

    "A Mediterranean diet may be a better way of tackling obesity than calorie counting, leading doctors have said," BBC News reports.

    In a recently published editorial, they also argue the NHS should do more to encourage its staff to eat more healthily.

    As this was an editorial, and not new evidence, it cannot prove...

  • Just one kiss 'spreads 80 million bugs'

    "A single 10-second kiss can transfer as many as 80 million bacteria," BBC News reports. Dutch scientists took "before and after" samples from 21 couples to see the effect an intimate kiss had on the bacteria found in the mouth.

    By studying the couples, the scientists discovered the bacteria found on the tongue are...

  • 'Good ways to pop a pill'

    “Just a spoonful of water helps the medicine go down: Scientists discover the best way to swallow tablets,” explains the Mail Online today.

    In fact, scientists haven’t necessarily discovered the “best” ways to take your medicine, they have simply tested two options and found that they work well – and neither involves just a spoonful of...

  • Do people who take weight loss pills eat unhealthily?

    "Are slimming pills fuelling the obesity epidemic?" asks the Mail Online, reporting on research that suggests dieters "mistakenly believe they can eat whatever they want" after taking weight loss drugs.

    There is nothing in the research to prove the Mail's headline. In fact, its headline was prompted by US...

  • Sex with funny, rich men linked with more orgasms

    “Women have stronger orgasms if their partner is funny – and rich”, says the Mail Online.

    This headline is wrong. And the research it’s based on, while fascinating, is rather inconclusive.

    The study in question asked a small group of female students, who were in sexual relationships with men, to anonymously rate their sex lives...

  • 'Smart drug' modafinil may not make you brainier

    “Smart drug ‘may help improve creative problem solving’,” is the headline in The Daily Telegraph.

    The media reports have been prompted by a new study on the effects of modafinil...

  • Long-term mobile phone use and brain cancer

    "Do mobile and cordless phones raise the risk of brain cancer?" asks the Mail Online.

    There are now more mobile phones than people in the UK, so you would expect the commonsense answer to be a resounding "no". But, as we never get tired of saying, it's a bit more complicated than that.

    The Mail Online...

  • Health workers 'neglect hygiene late in their shifts'

    “Visit hospital in the morning to be sure of a doctor with clean hands,” reports The Daily Telegraph.

    The Telegraph cites a US study which found healthcare workers often fail to wash their hands and are more likely to wash their hands as advised at the beginning of their shift (not necessarily the morning) than at the end.

    ...

  • Watching 'Dad's Army' won't stop you going blind

    "Fancy an episode of Dad's Army? How watching TV and films can save your eyesight," is the curious headline in the Daily Express.

    Its headline is a rather abstract interpretation of research testing the potential for new computer eye-tracking software to help diagnose chronic...

  • Genes tweaked to 'starve' prostate cancer cells

    "Prostate cancer could be 'halted' by injections," reports The Independent.

    While this headline rather simplifies the research findings, the research it's based on demonstrates an interesting way to stop prostate cancer – for mice, at...

  • Claims cannabis 'rewires the brain' misleading

    "Cannabis use 'shrinks and rewires' the brain," reports The Daily Telegraph, with much of the media reporting similar "brain rewiring" headlines.

    The headlines are based on a study that compared the brain structure and connections of cannabis users with those of non-users.

    The researchers identified several...

  • Anxiety affects children in different ways

    "Teenage anxiety: Tailored treatment needed," BBC News reports, saying a "one-size-fits-all approach to treating teenagers with anxiety problems may be putting their futures at risk."

    The news is based on research that looked at the diagnoses of a group of children and a group of adolescents – it did not look at...

  • Are pollution and attention problems related?

    “Could ADHD be triggered by mothers being exposed to air pollution while pregnant?,” asks the Mail Online.

    Pregnant women have enough to worry about, without going round in a gas mask or moving to the country. Fortunately, the study that this news relates to doesn’t find a connection between exposure to pollution while pregnant and...

  • Stem cells could repair Parkinson's damage

    "Stem cells can be used to heal the damage in the brain caused by Parkinson's disease," BBC News reports following the results of new Swedish research in rats.

    This study saw researchers transplant stem cells into rats' brains. These cells then developed into dopamine-producing brain cells.

    ...

  • Norovirus returns: advice is to stay away from GP

    After Halloween and Bonfire Night, we have the return of another, much less welcome, winter tradition: the norovirus. Or, as The Times reports, “Tis the season for winter vomiting bug”.

    The body responsible for public health in this country, Public Health...

  • Fruit chemical may prevent organ damage

    "Could fruit help heart attack patients? Injection of chemical helps reduce damage to vital organs and boosts survival," reports the Daily Mail – "at least in rodents," it should have added.

    When tissues are suddenly deprived of oxygen-rich blood (ischaemia), which can occur during a ...

  • Does having a hobby help you live longer?

    "Having a hobby can add YEARS to your life," The Daily Express reports. The headline is prompted by an international study that looked at ageing and happiness.

    The study found older people who reported the greatest sense of purpose in life survived longer than those who reported having little sense of purpose, suggesting that...

  • Smoking 'increases risk of chronic back pain'

    "Smokers are three times more likely to suffer from back pain," the Mail Online reports. The headline was prompted by the results of a recent study, which involved observing 68 people with sub-acute back pain (back pain lasting for 4 to 12 weeks with no...

  • 'Elite controllers' may provide clues for HIV cure

    “Scientists have uncovered the genetic mechanism which appeared to have led two HIV-infected men to experience a 'spontaneous cure’,” the Mail Online reports.

    The men are what is known as “elite controllers”: people thought to have high levels of immunity against the virus, as they do not develop any...

  • Short height 'linked to dementia death risk'

    "Short men more likely to die from dementia," The Daily Telegraph reports, though the results of the study it reports on are not as clear cut as the headline suggests.

    Researchers combined the results of 18 surveys, which included more than 180,000 people. They aimed to see whether reported height was associated with deaths...

  • Shift work 'ages the brain', study suggests

    “Shift work dulls your brain,” BBC News reports. In a French study, researchers assessed 3,232 adults using a variety of cognitive tests and compared the results between people who reported they had never performed shift work for more than 50 days per year with those that had. They analysed the results, comparing the number of years of...

  • Weight loss surgery cuts diabetes risk in very obese

    “Weight loss surgery can dramatically reduce the odds of developing type 2 diabetes,” BBC News reports.

    The underlying research identified a group of 2,167 obese adults without diabetes, the majority of whom were severely obese, with a ...

  • Sadness 'lasts longer' than other emotions

    "Sadness lasts 240 times longer than other emotions, study claims," is the somewhat sobering news on the Mail Online.

    Researchers surveyed 233 young adults from a Belgian high school with an average age of 17, and found emotions vary widely in duration.

    Of the 27 emotions studied, sadness lasted the longest, whereas...

  • Genes may play a role in Ebola survival chances

    "Genetic factors could play an important role in whether people survive the Ebola virus," BBC News reports. Researchers found around one in five mice remained unaffected by the infection.

    Researchers investigated how mice with a different genetic make-up responded to...

  • Brain differences linked to chronic fatigue syndrome

    "Scientists find three differences in the brain [of people with chronic fatigue syndrome]," the Mail Online reports.

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) affects around a quarter of a million people in the UK and causes persistent symptoms...

  • Does paracetamol ease pain of decision making?

    "Paracetamol could make difficult decisions less of a headache," the Mail Online reports. The story follows a US study that looked at whether taking paracetamol could reduce the pain of making difficult decisions.

    Researchers tested...

  • Details of autism genes uncovered in global study

    “A massive international study has started to unpick the ‘fine details’ of why some people develop autism,” BBC News reports.

    A team of international researchers looked for variations in the DNA sequences of the genes in 3,871 people with ...

  • Milk may be linked to bone fractures and early death

    "Drinking more than three glasses of milk a day may not protect bones against breaking – and may even lead to higher rates of death," the Mail Online reports.

    Do not be alarmed – your milkman is no Hallowe'en death-bringer. In fact, there are many reasons to treat this news – and the research behind it – with some caution....

  • Could sex with 21 women 'cut prostate risk'?

    "Sleeping with more than 20 women protects men against prostate cancer, academics find," The Daily Telegraph reports.

    The study in question included more than 1,500 men diagnosed with prostate cancer...

  • Placebo as 'effective as syrup' in treating coughs

    “Placebo cough treatment benefits children and their parents, study suggests,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    A US study found that children’s reported cough symptoms improved even though they were just given a dummy treatment (placebo).

    The study compared the effectiveness of agave nectar (a sweet syrup similar to honey, from...

  • Drugs may work better at certain times of the day

    “Take your medication at the right time of day or it might not work,” The Independent reports.

    The news is based on a study which looked at the pattern of genes made in 12 different mouse organs, to see if any of the genes showed a circadian rhythm (the “body clock”: where the body reacts to a day and night cycle).

    Nearly half...

  • Lab-grown killer cells could treat brain tumours

    "Scientists … have discovered a way of turning stem cells into killing machines to fight brain cancer," BBC News reports. While the results of this study were encouraging, the research involved mice, not humans.

    The headline is prompted by the creation of stem cells genetically engineered to produce a type of poison known as...

  • A mug of cocoa is not a cure for memory problems

    "Cup of cocoa could give the elderly the memory of a 'typical 30 or 40-year-old'," The Independent reports.

    Before you race down to the supermarket to pick up a tub of chocolatey powder, you might want to pause to consider some facts that rather undermine this headline.

    The news is based on a small study that found a...

  • 'Putting clocks forward boosts kids' exercise'

    “Moving the clocks forward by one extra hour all year in the UK could lead to children getting more exercise every day, say researchers,” reports BBC News.

    In the UK, the clocks move forward one hour during the summer months so that there are more daylight hours in the evening (daylight saving time).

    A new study has found that...

  • Sunshine isn't slimming and can't halt diabetes

    "Sunshine can make you thin," claims the Daily Mirror, while the Daily Express splashed on its front page that, "Sunlight is key to fighting diabetes". Both are strong contenders for the title of the day's most inaccurate health headline.

    The news – reported more circumspectly by The Times and BBC News – is based on...

  • Nightshift workers told to avoid iron-rich foods

    "Shift workers should avoid tucking into steak, brown rice or green veg at night," because these foods "disrupt the body clock," the Mail Online reports.

    But the research in question involved lab mice who were fed different amounts of dietary iron for six weeks to see what effect this had on the daily regulation...

  • Dopamine drug linked to sex, shopping & gambling

    “Drugs for restless leg syndrome cause gambling, hypersexuality and compulsive shopping,” Metro reports.

    Researchers in the US have looked at serious drug side effects reported to the FDA over a 10-year period. In particular, they were interested to see how often reports of impulsive behaviours such as gambling were linked to a group...

  • Changes in 'Parkinson's walk' predicts dementia

    "Subtle changes in the walking pattern of Parkinson's patients could predict their rate of cognitive decline," The Times reports after new research compared the gait of people with Parkinson's disease with those of healthy volunteers.

    ...

  • NICE wants tooth brushing to be taught in schools

    “Children should get their teeth brushed at school, says NHS watchdog,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    The headline follows the publication of guidance by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) on ways for local authorities to improve the oral health of their...

  • Paralysed man walks again after pioneering surgery

    "World first as man whose spinal cord was severed WALKS," the Mail Online reports. In pioneering research, transplanted cells have been used to stimulate the repair of a man's spinal cord.

    The headlines are based on a scientific report describing a 38-year-old man whose spinal cord was almost completely severed in a knife...

  • Living with a smoker 'as bad as living in Beijing'

    "Living with smoker 'as bad as living in polluted city'," BBC News reports. Scottish researchers have estimated that the level of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in smokers' households is similar to those found in a heavily polluted city such as Beijing.

    PM2.5 are tiny particles less than two and a half microns wide that are...

  • BMI tests 'miss' over a quarter of obese children

    "Quarter of obese children missed by BMI tests," the Mail Online reports.

    The headline was prompted by a review that combined the results of 37 studies in more than 50,000 children and found body mass index (BMI) is an imperfect way of detecting excess...

  • Viagra could double up as heart failure drug

    "Sex pill Viagra could help men suffering from heart disease," reports the Mirror. This headline follows a new review into the potential heart benefits of the active ingredient in erectile dysfunction drugs such as...

  • Exercise data signs could cut sugary drink intake

    “Signs warning shoppers how much exercise they need to do to burn off calories in sugary drinks can encourage healthier choices,” BBC News reports. Signs in shops in an area of Baltimore seemed to have led to a change in shopping habits amongst Afro-American teenagers.

    Researchers first studied beverage purchases by black teens at...

  • Vegetative patients show awareness during scans

    "Vegetative patients may be more conscious of the world than we think," The Independent reports. Electrodes have detected what has been described as "well-preserved" networks of brain activity in patients in a vegetative state.

    A vegetative state is when a person is awake and may have some basic motor reflexes,...

  • Crash diets 'work best' claim misguided

    “Crash diets DO work, claim experts,” the Mail Online reports.

    It reports on an Australian study involving 200 obese adults who were randomly assigned to either a 12-week rapid weight loss programme on a very low-calorie diet or a 36-week gradual weight loss programme.

    It found that 81% of people in the rapid weight loss...

  • New way to distinguish between ovarian tumours

    "A new test can help doctors identify ovarian cancer more accurately and cut down on instances of unnecessary surgery," BBC News reports.

    The BBC accurately reflects the findings of researchers who developed new tests for ovarian cancer. These tests use clinical and ultrasound findings to assess whether tumours are benign...

  • Stem cells used to improve low vision

    "Embryonic stem cells transplanted into eyes of blind restore sight," The Daily Telegraph reports, covering a study where human stem cells were transplanted into the eyes of people with visual impairment. This led to a significant improvement in their vision.

    This new research involved nine women with age-related macular...

  • Warnings issued over energy drinks

    “Energy drinks could cause public health problems, says WHO study,” The Guardian reports. A new review discusses the potential harms of these drinks, especially when they are mixed with alcohol.

    Energy drinks, such as Red Bull and Monster, contain high levels of caffeine, which is a stimulant. They have become increasingly popular...

  • Concerns raised about late diagnosis of lung cancer

    "Doctors in Britain are 'missing opportunities' to spot lung cancer at an early stage," BBC News reports. A study found around a third of people with the condition die within 90 days of their initial diagnosis.

    The study looked at the medical records of more than 20,000 adults who had been diagnosed with ...

  • Broccoli could 'hold the key' for treating autism

    "Broccoli chemical may improve autism symptoms," The Daily Telegraph reports. A small study suggests sulforaphane, a chemical that gives broccoli its distinctive taste, may help improve some of the symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD)...

  • Broccoli could 'hold the key' for treating autism

    "Broccoli chemical may improve autism symptoms," The Daily Telegraph reports. A small study suggests sulforaphane, a chemical that gives broccoli its distinctive taste, may help improve some of the symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD)...

  • Can we count on counting calories?

    It's a concept at the cornerstone of most diets: counting the calories of your food intake so you don't go over the limit.

    But just how accurate are calorie labels? And are some calories more "equal" than others?

    There is a seemingly endless stream of media articles focusing on the latest diet wonder, whether it...

  • 'Poo in a pill' may help treat C. difficile infection

    “Capsules containing frozen faecal material may help clear up C. difficile infections,” BBC News reports.

    While the prospect may sound stomach-churning, swallowing somebody else’s "poo" may help treat symptoms such as chronic diarrhoea, which can be life-threatening. 

    The headline is based on new research on 20 people...

  • Fruit juice link to high blood pressure not proven

    "Does drinking fruit juice give you high blood pressure?," the Mail Online asks, as an Australian study found people who reported a daily intake of fruit juice tended to have slightly higher blood pressure. This finding, the researchers argue,...

  • Is a cure for type 1 diabetes 'within reach'?

    "Type 1 diabetes cure within reach after breakthrough," The Independent reports after researchers have managed to "coax" human stem cells into becoming insulin-producing cells.

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the...

  • Antibiotic resistance continues to rise

    "Antibiotic resistance continues to rise," BBC News reports as, despite warnings, the number of antibiotic prescriptions in the UK continues to soar, as do new cases of resistant bacteria.

    Other news reports take different...

  • Could grapefruit juice protect against diabetes?

    “Grapefruit juice 'could be the key to weight loss’,'' is the misleading headline in The Daily Telegraph.

    It reports on a study in which mice fed a combination of a high-fat diet and grapefruit juice still put on weight – albeit at a lower rate than mice fed a sugary drink. Their blood sugar levels and insulin sensitivity were also...

  • 'Healthy foods expensive' claim is unrealistic

    “Healthy food now costs three times as much as junk, study shows,” The Independent reports. It also reports a sharper rise in the cost of fruit and veg over the past decade compared to other types of foods.

    This news story is based on research which looked at changes in the price of 94 food items in the UK in the decade from 2002 to...

  • Questions about life after death remain unanswered

    “Life after death is a real phenomenon,” the Metro reports – but the headline is pure hype. Researchers were actually looking at “near-death experiences” – a very different thing. Indeed, the research involved people who did not die (even “technically”).

    Near-death experiences are reported by people claiming to have...

  • Vaginal orgasm 'doesn't exist', researchers argue

    "There is no such thing as a vaginal orgasm," says the Mail Online, in a story that suggests some women have been diagnosed with sexual disorders based on the "myth" that they can orgasm through vaginal intercourse alone.

    The news comes from a review of existing (not new) evidence, and its authors make some very...

  • Ebola could reach UK, but outbreak risk is low

    “Global threat of Ebola: From the US to China, scientists plot spread of deadly disease across the world from its West African hotbed,” reports the Mail Online. This is a terrifyingly apocalyptic-sounding headline, yet the real story about Ebola is that, while still frightening and deadly, it is still a very low risk to people in the UK....

  • Cannabis labelled 'harmful and as addictive as heroin'

    "Cannabis: the terrible truth," is today's Daily Mail front page splash story. The paper cites the risks posed by cannabis – including a doubling of the risk of schizophrenia – based on research the paper says has "demolished the argument that the drug is safe".

    The "terrible truth" is we still don't know...

  • Eating with a fat friend 'makes you eat more'

    “Sitting next to overweight people makes you more likely to gorge on unhealthy food,” the Daily Express reports.

    The paper reports on a small-scale research experiment showing that the presence of an overweight woman (an actress in a fat suit) near a buffet made student volunteers choose and eat a larger amount of unhealthy food (...

  • Green tea compound may improve cancer drugs

    "Green tea could helps [sic] scientists develop new cancer fighting drugs," the Mail Online reports. But before you rush out to the shops, in no way does this study suggest green tea can fight cancer.

    Instead, research has found a compound in green tea – the catchily named Epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) – may help...

  • Study finds clue to why colds trigger asthma

    The Mail Online reports how "a simple cold can set off a deadly asthma attack: Scientists discover chemical can send the immune system into overdrive".

    It is well known that in people with asthma, respiratory infections such as ...

  • Moderate regular drinking may 'damage sperm'

    “Just five alcoholic drinks a week could reduce sperm quality,” The Guardian reports. A study involving Danish military recruits found that even moderate drinking, if done regularly, was associated with a drop in quality.

    The study involved 1,200 young Danish military recruits (with an average age of 19), and assessed their semen...

  • Scientists look into regenerating retinal cells

    “Scientists … have discovered stem cells in the human eye which can be transformed into light-sensitive cells and potentially reverse blindness,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    While this story is an accurate summary, the research is still at a very early stage, but does show potential.

    The cells in question are called limbal...

  • Does losing your sense of smell predict death risk?

    "Sense of smell 'may predict lifespan'," BBC News reports. New research suggests people unable to smell distinctive scents such as peppermint or fish may have an increased risk of death within five years of losing their sense of smell.

    The study found older adults aged 57 or above who could not correctly identify five...

  • Minimum alcohol pricing would 'save 100s of lives'

    “‘Hundreds of lives lost' over failure to bring in minimum alcohol pricing,” The Independent reports.

    The news is based on research that modelled the effect of a minimum alcohol price per unit of around 40-50p. It suggested that this would be 50 times more effective than the current ban on "below-cost sales" (where alcohol...

  • Viagra 'may cause visual disturbance' in some men

    "Viagra may permanently damage vision in some men, study finds," reports The Guardian. But the news is, in fact, based on research in mice.

    This research suggests the medication may not be suitable for men who carry a gene mutation associated with the inherited eye condition retinitis pigmentosa.

    Researchers found...

  • One in eight three-year-olds has tooth decay

    "Tooth decay affects 12% of three-year-olds, says survey," BBC News reports. The survey, carried out by Public Health England, found big variations in different parts of the country. Experts believe sugary drinks are to blame for this trend.

    The survey looked at the prevalence and severity of tooth decay in three-year-old...

  • Deep-fried Mars bars – unhealthy, but no killer

    “Eating a deep-fried Mars bar could give you a stroke in minutes,” reports the Metro.

    However, the study that prompted this headline found no evidence that the Scottish snack can potentially trigger a fatal stroke within minutes. 

    Fans of deep-fried Mars bars actually have little to worry about in this regard, aside from the...

  • Will a 'wonder drug' be available in 10 years?

    "Wonder drug to fight cancer and Alzheimer's disease within 10 years," is the headline in The Daily Telegraph.

    This headline is a textbook example of hope (and hype) triumphing over reality, as the new "wonder drug" is neither available today nor inevitable in the future.

    The headline was based on a study...

  • Cherry juice touted as treatment for gout

    “Daily drinks of cherry juice concentrate could help thousands of patients beat gout,” the Mail on Sunday reports.

    This headline is based on a small study that found drinking tart cherry juice twice a day temporarily lowered the blood uric acid levels of 12 young healthy volunteers for up to eight hours after they consumed the drink....

  • Could curry spice boost brain cell repair?

    “Spicy diet can beat dementia,” is the unsupported claim in the Daily Express. Researchers found that the spice turmeric stimulated the growth of neural stem cells in rats, though this is a long way from an effective dementia treatment for humans.

    This was laboratory and animal research investigating the effect of a turmeric extract (...

  • Could curry spice boost brain cell repair?

    “Spicy diet can beat dementia,” is the unsupported claim in the Daily Express. Researchers found that the spice turmeric stimulated the growth of neural stem cells in rats, though this is a long way from an effective dementia treatment for humans.

    This was laboratory and animal research investigating the effect of a turmeric extract (...

  • Antibiotic treatments 'fail' 15% of the time

    “Antibiotic treatments from GPs 'fail 15% of the time’,'' BBC News reports. In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers estimated that just under one in seven antibiotic prescriptions in 2011 "failed".

    This study examined the...

  • 15% of antibiotic treatments 'fail'

    “Antibiotic treatments from GPs 'fail 15% of the time’,'' BBC News reports. In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers estimated that just under one in seven antibiotic prescriptions in 2011 "failed".

    This study examined...

  • Skirt size increase ups breast cancer risk

    “Skirt size increase linked to breast cancer risk,” BBC News reports. The story comes from a UK study of nearly 93,000 postmenopausal women that looked at whether changes in skirt size since their twenties was associated with increased risk of breast...

  • Skirt size increase ups breast cancer risk

    “Skirt size increase linked to breast cancer risk,” BBC News reports. The story comes from a UK study of nearly 93,000 postmenopausal women that looked at whether changes in skirt size since their twenties was associated with increased risk of breast...

  • Media multitasking 'brain shrink' claims unproven

    “Multitasking makes your brain smaller,” the Daily Mail reports. UK researchers found that people who regularly “media multitasked” had less grey matter in a region of the brain involved in emotion.

    The researchers were specifically interested in what they term media multitasking; for example checking your Twitter feed on your...

  • Media multitasking 'brain shrink' claims unproven

    “Multitasking makes your brain smaller,” the Daily Mail reports. UK researchers found that people who regularly “media multitasked” had less grey matter in a region of the brain involved in emotion.

    The researchers were specifically interested in what they term media multitasking; for example checking your Twitter feed on your...

  • Benefits of statins 'outweigh diabetes risk'

    “Statins increase risk of diabetes, but benefits are still worth it, say experts,” The Guardian reports.

    A large study found the medication lead to a modest increase in weight and subsequent diabetes risk. The authors report that these risks were more than offset by the reduction in...

  • Benefits of statins 'outweigh diabetes risk'

    “Statins increase risk of diabetes, but benefits are still worth it, say experts,” The Guardian reports.

    A large study found the medication lead to a modest increase in weight and subsequent diabetes risk. The authors report that these risks were more than offset by the reduction in...

  • Ebola set to get worse

    “Ebola infections will treble to 20,000 by November,” BBC News reports, following the publication of an analysis of the current epidemic by the World Health Organization (WHO).

    The report assesses what is known about the spread and devastating impact of the Ebola outbreak to date, while also predicting what may happen in the near...

  • Ebola outbreak to get worse, says WHO

    “Ebola infections will treble to 20,000 by November,” BBC News reports, following the publication of an analysis of the current epidemic by the World Health Organization (WHO).

    The report assesses what is known about the spread and devastating impact of the Ebola outbreak to date, while also predicting what may happen in the near...

  • Watch less TV to prevent obesity, says NICE

    “Take TV-free days to combat obesity, health experts urge,” The Guardian reports. This is one of a range of new recommendations from National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) draft guidelines that are designed to help adults and children maintain a healthy weight....

  • Job insecurity may increase adult asthma risk

    “People fearful of losing their jobs are 60% more likely to develop asthma,” The Independent reports.

    Researchers have looked at whether perceived job insecurity (specifically, the likelihood that they would lose their jobs) affected people’s risk of developing ...

  • Watch less TV to prevent obesity, says NICE

    “Take TV-free days to combat obesity, health experts urge,” The Guardian reports. This is one of a range of new recommendations from National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) draft guidelines that are designed to help adults and children maintain a healthy weight....

  • Job insecurity may increase adult asthma risk

    “People fearful of losing their jobs are 60% more likely to develop asthma,” The Independent reports.

    Researchers have looked at whether perceived job insecurity (specifically, the likelihood that they would lose their jobs) affected people’s risk of developing ...

  • Late cancer diagnosis 'costing lives and money'

    "Almost half of cancer patients diagnosed too late," says The Guardian, citing a new report that explored both the financial and health impact of late cancer diagnosis.

    The late diagnosis of almost all types of cancer usually means the disease has already spread within the body, making it less treatable, reducing a patient's...

  • Late cancer diagnosis 'costing lives and money'

    "Almost half of cancer patients diagnosed too late," says The Guardian, citing a new report that explored both the financial and health impact of late cancer diagnosis.

    The late diagnosis of almost all types of cancer usually means the disease has already spread within the body, making it less treatable, reducing a patient'...

  • Dry-roasted peanuts may be worst for nut allergies

    “Dry-roasted peanuts 'worst for allergies',” the Mail Online reports. New research involving mice suggests that the roasting process increases the "allergic power" of peanuts.

    Researchers exposed mice to small amounts of proteins derived from either "raw" peanuts or dry-roasted peanuts, to “prime” their immune...

  • Dry-roasted peanuts may be worst for nut allergies

    “Dry-roasted peanuts 'worst for allergies',” the Mail Online reports. New research involving mice suggests that the roasting process increases the "allergic power" of peanuts.

    Researchers exposed mice to small amounts of proteins derived from either "raw" peanuts or dry-roasted peanuts, to “prime” their immune...

  • Mums 'feel shame' about how they feed their babies

    "Mothers are made to feel 'marginalised and ashamed' when they breastfeed in public, according to an international study," the Mail Online reports. But the same study found mothers who bottlefeed also feel subject to criticism.

    The study used discussion groups and interviews to explore the thoughts, feelings and experiences...

  • 'Angelina Jolie effect' doubled breast gene tests

    “Referrals to breast cancer clinics more than doubled in the UK after Angelina Jolie announced she had had a double mastectomy,” BBC News reports. NHS services saw a sharp rise in referrals from women worried about their family history of breast cancer.

    In May 2013, actress Angelina Jolie announced that she had decided to undergo a...

  • Chokeberry extract 'boosts pancreas cancer chemo'

    “Wild berries native to North America may have a role in boosting cancer therapy,” BBC News reports.

    It has been found – in a laboratory study using pancreatic cancer cells – that chokeberry extract may help increase the powers of chemotherapy drugs in treating ...

  • Do artificial sweeteners raise diabetes risk?

    "Artificial sweeteners may promote diabetes, claim scientists," reports The Guardian. But before you go clearing your fridge of diet colas, the research in question – extensive as it was – was mainly in mice.

    The researchers' experiments suggest artificial sweeteners, particularly saccharin, change the bacteria that normally...

  • Cosmetics blamed for raised child asthma risk

    "Chemicals in make-up and perfumes fuelling rise in children with asthma," reports the Mail Online.

    One scientist, the website claims, suggests that women should take measures such as checking the contents of their make-up and avoiding using plastic containers for food.

    This story is based on research following 300...

  • HPV urine test could screen for cervical cancer

    "A simple urine test which can detect the human papilloma virus (HPV) could offer women a much less invasive alternative to [current] cervical cancer screening," The Independent reports.

    Research found urine-based testing for HPV DNA showed signs it might be accurate enough to provide a viable screening method, given...

  • Sugar intake guideline 'needs lowering'

    “Sugar intake must be slashed further,” reports BBC News today.

    The news reports follow an ecological study estimating the burden of disease caused by sugar-related tooth decay in adults and children across a life course, in a number of different countries...

  • Brain scans offer fresh insights into ADHD

    "Doctors could soon diagnose ADHD in children with a brain scan," is the over-exuberant headline from the Mail Online.

    The underlying research, based on comparing the brain scans of 133 people with attention deficit...

  • 'Rebooted' stem cells may lead to new treatments

    "Scientists have managed to 'reset' human stem cells," the Mail Online reports. It is hoped studying these cells will provide more information about the mechanics of early human development.

    This headline comes from a laboratory study that reports to have found a way to turn the clock back on human stem cells so they exhibit...

  • Could meditation help combat migraines?

    “Daily meditation may be the most effective way of tackling migraine,” the Daily Express reports.

    This headline is not justified, as it was based on a small pilot study involving just 19 people.

    It showed that an eight week "mindfulness-based stress reduction course" (a combination of mediation and yoga-based practices...

  • Pregnant drink binges harm kids' mental health

    “Binge drinking ONCE during pregnancy can damage your child's mental health and school results,” says the Mail Online. 

    The headline follows an analysis of results from a study including thousands of women and their children. In analyses of up to 7,000 children, researchers found that children of women who engaged in binge drinking at...

  • Weight discrimination study fuels debate

    Much of the media has reported that discriminatory “fat shaming” makes people who are overweight eat more, rather than less.

    The Daily Mail describes how, “telling someone they are piling on the pounds just makes them delve further into the biscuit tin”. While this image may seem like a commonsense “comfort eating” reaction, the...

  • 'Food addiction' doesn't exist, say scientists

    “Food is not addictive ... but eating is: Gorging is psychological compulsion, say experts,” the Mail Online reports.

    The news follows an article in which scientists argue that – unlike drug addiction – there is little evidence that people become addicted to the substances in certain foods.

    Researchers argue that instead of...

  • Bacteria found in honey may help fight infection

    “Bacteria found in honeybee stomachs could be used as alternative to antibiotics,” reports The Independent.

    The world desperately needs new antibiotics to counter the growing threat of bacteria developing resistance to drug treatment. A new study has found that 13 bacteria strains living in honeybees’ stomachs can reduce the growth of...

  • Hundreds report waking up during surgery

    “At least 150, and possibly several thousand, patients a year are conscious while they are undergoing operations,” The Guardian reports. A report suggests “accidental awareness” during surgery occurs in around one in 19,000 operations.

    The report containing this information is the...

  • Prescription sleeping pills linked to Alzheimer’s risk

    “Prescription sleeping pills … can raise chance of developing Alzheimer's by 50%,” reports the Mail Online.

    This headline is based on a study comparing the past use of benzodiazepines, such as...

  • Sibling bullying linked to young adult depression

    “Being bullied regularly by a sibling could put children at risk of depression when they are older,” BBC News reports.

    A new UK study followed children from birth to early adulthood. Analysis of more than 3,000 children found those who reported frequent sibling bullying at age 12 were about twice as likely to report high levels of...

  • Regular walking breaks 'protect arteries'

    “Just a five-minute walk every hour helps protect against damage of sitting all day,” the Mail Online reports.

    A study of 12 healthy but inactive young men found that if they sat still without moving their legs for three hours, the walls of their main leg artery showed signs of decreased flexibility. However, this was “prevented” if...

  • Ebola vaccine hope after successful animal study

    “Hopes for an effective Ebola vaccine have been raised after trials of an experimental jab found that it gave monkeys long-term protection,” The Guardian reports. An initial animal study found that a new vaccine boosted immunity.

    Ebola is an extremely...

  • Wearing a bra 'doesn't raise breast cancer risk'

    “Scientists believe they have answered the decades long debate on whether wearing a bra can increase your risk of cancer,” reports The Daily Telegraph.

    There is an "urban myth" that wearing a bra disrupts the workings of the lymphatic system (an essential part of the immune system), which could lead to a build-up of toxins...

  • Gay people have 'poorer health' and 'GP issues'

    “Lesbians, gays and bisexuals are more likely to have longstanding mental health problems,” The Independent reports, as well as “bad experiences with their GP”. A UK survey found striking disparities in survey responses compared to heterosexuals.

    The news is based on the results of a survey in England of more than 2 million people,...

  • 1 in 5 child deaths 'preventable'

    “One in five child deaths ‘preventable’,” reports BBC News.

    The headline was prompted by the publication of a three-part series of papers on child death in high-income countries published in The Lancet.

    The reviews outlined the need for child death reviews to identify modifiable risk factors, described patterns of child...

  • How immunotherapy may treat multiple sclerosis

    “Breakthrough hope for MS treatment as scientists discover how to ‘switch off’ autoimmune diseases,” reports the Mail Online.

    Autoimmune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), occur when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys healthy body...

  • Claims e-cigarettes are a 'gateway to cocaine'

    “E-cigarettes could lead to using cocaine and cannabis scientists say,” the Daily Mirror reports.

    In an article sure to prove controversial, two neuroscientists argue that nicotine may "prime" the brain to become addicted to harder drugs, such as cocaine.

    The story comes from an article that argues...

  • What is proton beam therapy?

    Proton beam therapy has been discussed widely in the media in recent days.

    This is due to the controversy surrounding the treatment of a young boy called Ashya King, who has medulloblastoma, a type of brain cancer.

    Ashya was reportedly taken abroad by his parents to receive proton beam therapy.

    But what does proton beam...

  • Missing breakfast linked to type 2 diabetes

    "Skipping breakfast in childhood may raise the risk of diabetes," the Mail Online reports. A study of UK schoolchildren found that those who didn’t regularly eat breakfast had early signs of having risk markers for type 2 diabetes.

    The study...

  • Lumpectomy 'as effective as double mastectomy'

    “Double mastectomy for breast cancer 'does not boost survival chances' – when compared to breast-conserving surgery," The Guardian reports.

    The news is based on the results of a large US cohort study of women with early stage breast cancer...

  • Could watching action films make you fat?

    “Couch potatoes captivated by fast-paced action films eat far more than those watching more sedate programmes,” The Independent reports.

    A small US study found that people snacked more when watching action-packed movies.

    The study took 94 US student volunteers and randomly assigned them in groups to watch 20 minutes of either...

  • Brain can be ‘retrained’ to prefer healthy foods

    “The brain can be trained to prefer healthy food over unhealthy high-calorie foods, using a diet which does not leave people hungry,” reports BBC News.

    It reports on a small pilot study involving 13 overweight and obese people who, aside from their weight, were...

  • Heart failure drug could 'cut deaths by a fifth'

    “A new drug believed to cause a 20 per cent reduction in heart failure deaths could present a 'major advance' in treatment,” The Independent reports.

    The drug, LCZ696, helps improve blood flow in heart failure patients. Heart failure is a syndrome caused by the heart not working properly, which can make people vulnerable to serious...

  • Students 'showing signs of phone addiction'

    “Students spend up to 10 hours a day on their mobile phones,” the Mail Online reports. The results of a US study suggest that some young people have developed an addiction to their phone.

    Mobile or “cell” phone addiction is the habitual drive or compulsion to continue to use a mobile phone, despite its negative impact on one’s...

  • Plain cigarette pack fears 'unfounded,' says study

    "Cigarette plain packaging fear campaign unfounded," reports The Guardian.

    After Australia introduced plain packaging laws in 2012, opponents of the legislation argued it would lead to a number of unintended consequences, including:

    • the market would become flooded by cheap Asian brands
    • smokers...
  • Claims magnetic brain stimulation helps memory

    “Magnetic brain stimulation treatment shown to boost memory,” The Guardian reports. A new study found that magnetic pulses improved recall skills in healthy individuals. It is hoped that the findings of this study could lead to therapies for people with memory deficits such as...

  • Tomato-rich diet 'reduces prostate cancer risk'

    “Tomatoes ‘cut risk of prostate cancer by 20%’,” the Daily Mail reports, citing a study that found men who ate 10 or more portions a week had a reduced risk of the disease.

    The study in question gathered a year’s dietary information from 1,806 men who were found to have ...

  • Depression therapy aids other cancer symptoms

    "Depression therapy could help cancer patients fight illness," reports The Daily Telegraph.

    The headline follows a study of intensive treatment of clinical depression given to people who had both depression and cancer – delivered as part of their...

  • Does weight loss surgery affect dementia risk?

    "Weight loss surgery 'reduces chance of Alzheimer's disease'," reports The Daily Telegraph. This misleading headline reports on a small Brazilian study of severely obese women before and after weight loss surgery. None of the women had any signs or symptoms of Alzheimer's.

    Seventeen women with an average body mass index (BMI...

  • Antidepressant use in pregnancy linked to ADHD

    “Pregnant women who take anti-depressants 'could raise their child's risk of ADHD',” reports the Mail Online, saying that this could explain “the rise in children with short attention spans”.

    The study in question compared children with ...

  • Common bacteria could help prevent food allergies

    "Bacteria which naturally live inside our digestive system can help prevent allergies and may become a source of treatment," BBC News reports after new research found evidence that Clostridia bacteria helps prevent peanut allergies in mice.

    The study in question showed that mice lacking normal gut bacteria showed increased...

  • Breakfast 'not the most important meal of the day'

    "Breakfast might not be the most important meal of the day after all,” the Mail Online reports.

    The concept that breakfast is the most important meal of the day is up there in the pantheon of received wisdom with “never swim after eating” or “getting wet will give you a cold”. But is there any hard evidence to back the claim?

    ...
  • Autistic brain 'overloaded with connections'

    "Scientists discover people with autism have too many brain 'connections'," the Mail Online reports. US research suggests that people with an autistic spectrum disorder have an excessive amount of neural connections inside their brain.

    The headline is based on the results of a study that found that at post-mortem, brains of...

  • Dual vaccine approach could help eradicate polio

    Double vaccines "could hasten the end of polio", BBC News reports. Researchers in India found that using a combination of the oral and injected vaccines provided enhanced protection against the disease.

    Polio is a viral infection that can cause paralysis and death. Thanks to initiatives such as the ...

  • Botox may be useful in treating stomach cancers

    "Botox may have cancer fighting role," BBC News reports after research involving mice found using Botox to block nerve signals to the stomach may help slow the growth of stomach cancers. Botox, short for botulinum toxin, is a powerful...

  • 'Fat and 30' link to dementia is inconclusive

    “People as young as 30 who are obese may be at greater risk [of dementia],” The Independent reports.

    This UK study examined a set 14-year period (1998 to 2011) and looked at whether NHS hospital records documenting obesity in adults above the...

  • Could failure to breastfeed cause depression?

    Mothers who plan, but are unable, to breastfeed their babies are more likely to suffer from postnatal depression, report BBC News and The Independent.

    A study of 14,000 women in England found that those who planned to breastfeed but had not managed to were two-and-a-half times more likely to develop postnatal depression, compared to...

  • Common antibiotic linked to 'tiny' rise in heart deaths

    An antibiotic given to millions of people in the UK to treat chest infections has been linked to an increased risk of heart death, report The Daily Telegraph and The Independent.

    A Danish study of three antibiotics found the risk of death from any heart condition while taking the antibiotic clarithromycin is slightly higher than with...

  • Are good neighbours really life-savers?

    “Having good neighbours can help cut heart attack risk,” reports The Independent.

    The paper reports on a nationally representative US study of over 5,000 adults over the age of 50.

    People were asked about how they rated their neighbourhood social cohesion, then followed up for four years to see if they had a...

  • Targeted brain stimulation 'could aid stroke recovery'

    "Stimulating the part of the brain which controls movement may improve recovery after a stroke," BBC News reports after researchers used lasers to stimulate a particular region of the brain with promising results in mice.

    The researchers were looking at a sub-type of stroke known as...

  • Depression 'common' in early Parkinson’s

    “Depression more common in early Parkinson’s,” BBC News reports, as a new study investigates the impact this degenerative condition can have on mental health.

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurological condition caused by a lack of the chemical dopamine...

  • Bone marrow drug could treat alopecia

    “Alopecia sufferers given new treatment hope with repurposed drug,” The Guardian reports.

    Alopecia is a type of autoimmune condition where the body’s own immune cells start to attack the hair follicles for an unknown reason, leading to hair loss.

    ...

  • Macmillan finds cancer survival 'postcode lottery'

    “Cancer postcode lottery ‘costs 6,000 lives a year’,” reports The Times.

    This, and similar headlines, are based on cancer survival figures compiled by Macmillan Cancer Support. The cancer charity’s report suggests that the proportion of people who die within a year of a ...

  • Caution urged over CT scan radiation doses

    BBC News reports on a sharp rise in the number of CT scans being performed, exposing people to the potential health risks of radiation.

    However, as The Daily Telegraph says, it is not possible to calculate the cancer risk due to exposure to CT scans because there is a lack of data.

    These media stories follow the publication of...

  • High-salt diet linked to 1.6 million heart deaths

    "Salty diet 'causes 1.6 million deaths worldwide each year'," reports The Daily Telegraph. It goes on to quote a researcher saying this is "nearly 1 in 10 of all deaths from cardiovascular causes worldwide".

    This scary-sounding headline has a grain of truth in it, but the science it's based on doesn't prove that...

  • Is UK obesity fuelling an increase in 10 cancers?

    “Being overweight and obese puts people at greater risk of developing 10 of the most common cancers,” reports BBC News.

    The news is based on research using information in UK GP records for more than 5 million people, to see whether body mass index (BMI) was...

  • Salt injections: not a cure for cancer

    “Salt injection ‘kills cancer cells’ by causing them to self-destruct,” reports the Mail Online.

    Despite this headline, there is no new treatment for cancer using salt. The Mail Online reports on an early phase of experiments in laboratories that have worked out how increasing the amount of sodium chloride (salt) within a cell causes...

  • Anti-obesity drugs 'may still work in middle-age'

    “Drug to halt the dreaded spread of middle age,” reports The Daily Telegraph, with similar headlines on the Daily Express and Daily Mail websites.

    However, these claims are rather premature given the research they’re based on anti-obesity drugs that aren’t licensed for use in the UK. Also, the study in question involved mice, not...

  • Growth of newborn babies' brains tracked

    "Scans chart how quickly babies' brains grow," reports BBC News Online.

    The headline follows a fascinating study that shows newborn babies' brains are about a third the size of an adult's at birth, and rapidly grow to just over half the size of an adult's within three months.

    The study involved 87 healthy babies who...

  • Toothbrushing advice 'conflicting'

    "Teeth-brushing advice unacceptably inconsistent," reports The Guardian, while the Mail Online states that a "simple, gentle scrub is best".

    These headlines relate to a small literature review that found diversity in the methods of manual toothbrushing recommended by dental associations, toothpaste and toothbrush...

  • Exercise may cut breast cancer risk, study finds

    "Exercise lowers risk of breast cancer after menopause," reports The Independent. This and similar headlines were sparked by a large study of postmenopausal teachers that found increased recreational activity was associated with a 10% decrease in the risk of breast cancer.

    The risk reduction eroded among some women who became...

  • 'Safe' stem cell therapy may help stroke recovery

    BBC Online today reports that "Stem cells show promise in stroke recovery".

    This accurate headline comes from a study showing how a new technique using a patient's own stem cells to aid recovery from severe ischaemic stoke is feasible and appears to be safe.

    But the study was tiny – just five people had the treatment...

  • Restaurant dining 'as calorific as fast food'

    "Eating in restaurants no better than fast food for health," reports The Daily Telegraph after the publication of a study on the calorie intake of eating out.

    The US study found people who enjoyed dining at a full-service restaurant consumed just as many calories as those who ate fast food.

    Researchers looked at the...

  • Restaurant dining 'as calorific as fast food'

    "Eating in restaurants no better than fast food for health," reports The Daily Telegraph after the publication of a study on the calorie intake of eating out.

    The US study found people who enjoyed dining at a full-service restaurant consumed just as many calories as those who ate fast food.

    Researchers looked at the...

  • Dieting leaves some people 'feeling depressed'

    "It's official; dieting does make us depressed," laments the Mail Online, following the publication of a study on how losing weight affects a person’s mood.

    A study of 1,979 overweight and obese people found that those who lost 5% of their bodyweight were nearly twice as likely to feel some symptoms of depression, compared...

  • Dieting leaves some people 'feeling depressed'

    "It's official; dieting does make us depressed," laments the Mail Online, following the publication of a study on how losing weight affects a person’s mood.

    A study of 1,979 overweight and obese people found that those who lost 5% of their bodyweight were nearly twice as likely to feel some symptoms of depression, compared...

  • Lack of vitamin D may 'raise dementia risk'

    People lacking in vitamin D have a higher risk of developing dementia report several media outlets, including BBC News and The Independent.

    A study found people severely lacking in the sunshine vitamin were twice as likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer's disease compared with people with healthy levels (50nmol/l or more).

    ...

  • Lack of vitamin D may 'raise dementia risk'

    People lacking in vitamin D have a higher risk of developing dementia report several media outlets, including BBC News and The Independent.

    A study found people severely lacking in the sunshine vitamin were twice as likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer's disease compared with people with healthy levels (50nmol/l or more).

    ...

  • Salt content in cheese 'too high', say campaigners

    "Halloumi and blue cheese saltier than seawater,” reports The Daily Telegraph, following the publication of research on the salt content of cheeses sold in the UK.

    Researchers looked at 612 supermarket cheeses and found that salt levels were high. They also found a wide variation in salt content within the same types of cheese...

  • Salt content in cheese 'too high', say campaigners

    "Halloumi and blue cheese saltier than seawater,” reports The Daily Telegraph, following the publication of research on the salt content of cheeses sold in the UK.

    Researchers looked at 612 supermarket cheeses and found that salt levels were high. They also found a wide variation in salt content within the same types of cheese...

  • Saturated fat in dairy 'may protect against diabetes'

    Saturated fat in cheese, yoghurt and other dairy products may protect against diabetes, report the Mail Online, The Daily Telegraph and The Independent.

    A study has found that people with higher levels of the types of saturated fatty acid found in dairy products were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

    Saturated fat – ...

  • Saturated fat in dairy 'may protect against diabetes'

    Saturated fat in cheese, yoghurt and other dairy products may protect against diabetes, report the Mail Online, The Daily Telegraph and The Independent.

    A study has found that people with higher levels of the types of saturated fatty acid found in dairy products were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

    Saturated fat – ...

  • Daily aspirin 'reduces cancer risk,' study finds

    Taking aspirin every day could cut your risk of developing cancer, report BBC News and The Daily Telegraph among other news outlets, after the publication of a large-scale review of the evidence.

    People aged between 50 and 65 who take aspirin every day for 10 years could cut their risk of bowel cancer by 30% and cancers of the throat...

  • Daily aspirin 'reduces cancer risk', study finds

    Taking aspirin every day could cut your risk of developing cancer, report BBC News and The Daily Telegraph among other news outlets, after the publication of a large-scale review of the evidence.

    People aged between 50 and 65 who take aspirin every day for 10 years could cut their risk of bowel cancer by 30% and cancers of the throat...

  • Steep rise in antibiotic use for coughs and colds

    GPs are still giving out antibiotics to treat coughs and colds, the Mail Online, The Daily Telegraph and BBC News report, as a study reveals efforts to curb antibiotic use has had "mixed success".

    The study found the proportion of people with coughs and colds given antibiotics rose from 36% in 1999 to 51% in 2011: an increase...

  • Steep rise in antibiotic use for coughs and colds

    GPs are still giving out antibiotics to treat coughs and colds, the Mail Online, The Daily Telegraph and BBC News report, as a study reveals efforts to curb antibiotic use has had "mixed success".

    The study found the proportion of people with coughs and colds given antibiotics rose from 36% in 1999 to 51% in 2011: an increase...

  • Could HIV drugs help treat multiple sclerosis?

    "Could MS patients be treated with HIV drugs?" ask the Mail Online and The Independent, after a new study discovered people with HIV were almost two-thirds less likely (62%) to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) than those who did not have the virus.

    The study was prompted by the case of a patient who had HIV and MS, but stayed...

  • Could HIV drugs help treat multiple sclerosis?

    "Could MS patients be treated with HIV drugs?" ask the Mail Online and The Independent, after a new study discovered people with HIV were almost two-thirds less likely (62%) to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) than those who did not have the virus.

    The study was prompted by the case of a patient who had HIV and MS, but...

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