Bedford Hill Family Practice

120 Bedford Hill
Balham
SW12 9HS
Tel: 020 8673 1720

Family Planning

All doctors are able to offer family planning advice during their normal surgery. Oral contraceptives: Please make an appointment with a practice nurse (or a GP).

  • Coils: Fitted at the Family Planning Clinic
  • Contraceptive implants: We do not fit these at the surgery and will ask you to attend the Family Planning Clinic at Balham Health Centre.
  • Contraceptive injections: Are administered by the practice nurses.
  • Emergency Contraception: Please contact a practice nurse (or a GP) as soon as possible.

The Family Planning Clinic at Balham Health Centre is held on the following days:

Tuesday 6.00pm - 8.00pm
Thursday 9.30am - 11.30am
Friday 5.00pm - 7.00pm

 

 

NHS Choices - Behind the headlines

  • Social care reforms announced

    Most of the UK media is covering the announcement made in Parliament by Jeremy Hunt, Secretary of State for Health, about proposed changes to social care.

    The two confirmed points to have garnered the most media attention in the run-up to the announcement are:

    • a ‘cost cap’ of £75,000 worth of care costs – after this...
  • 'Morning sickness' linked to healthier babies

    “Morning sickness isn't all bad news: Women battling the condition may have 'healthier, more intelligent babies’,” the Mail Online reports.

    The news is based on the results of a systematic review that looked at the effects of “morning sickness”. Health professionals prefer the term “...

  • Eating more than 5 a day 'brings no extra benefit'

    "Eating more than five a day has 'no extra health benefit'," reports The Independent. The paper reports on a review that combined the results of previous research looking at the effect of increasing the amount of fruit and vegetables people eat.

    One of the things they specifically wanted to look at was whether there is a...

  • Tiny area of the brain linked to fear of the future

    "Pea-sized brain hub could shed light on depression," BBC News reports. UK scientists think they have identified part of the brain responsible for feelings of foreboding. This part of the brain, called the habenula, may also be associated with depression.

    The headline is based on a small study that used brain scans to look...

  • Running 7 minutes a day 'halves heart death risk'

    "Running for just a few minutes each day can reduce the risk of dying from heart disease," The Guardian reports.

    Ultimately, you can't outrun the Grim Reaper. But this news accurately reflects the results of a large long-term US study on health outcomes.

    And unlike yesterday's superficially similar ...

  • Over-60s 'benefit from bursts of intense exercise'

    "Two minute of exercise … is enough to boost pensioners' health," the Daily Mirror reports. A pilot study into high intensity training suggests it may be an effective method of combating the effects of ageing.

    However, the UK media are guilty of hyping the implications of a small study, involving just 12 people, which...

  • Should donor blood be screened for hepatitis E?

    "One in almost every 3,000 blood donors in England could be infected with hepatitis E, according to a new study," The Times reports.

    Hepatitis E normally causes only a mild infection that usually clears up without the need for treatment. It can occasionally lead to more serious complications in more vulnerable groups, such...

  • Study links shift work to increased risk of diabetes

    “Type 2 diabetes is more common in people who work shifts, a large international study suggests,” BBC News reports.

    The BBC reports on a review that searched the literature and found 12 studies including more than 225,000 people which looked at the link between shift work and diabetes.

    When pooling the results the researchers...

  • TV and gaming after work 'leads to feelings of guilt'

    “Watching TV after work makes you feel ‘guilty and like a failure’,” says The Independent, citing a study looking at the concept of “ego depletion”.

    Ego depletion is the idea that after a gruelling task your levels of self-control become drained. So after a hard day’s work, instead of going to the gym as you promised yourself, you...

  • Deadly MERS 'camel flu' may now be airborne

    “Deadly Mers virus 'could now be airborne',” The Independent reports. The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) virus, which has an estimated case fatality rate of 30%, has been detected in an air sample in a camel barn in Saudi Arabia. This raises the possibility the virus could be spread through the air in the same way as flu.

    ...

  • Paracetamol 'doesn't work' for lower back pain

    “Paracetamol used to treat acute lower back pain is no better than a dummy pill,” BBC News reports. A well-conducted trial casts doubts on the widespread recommendation that paracetamol is an effective treatment for...

  • Sleep deprivation may affect memory

    The Mail Online states that “just one bad night’s sleep can have a dramatic effect on your memory – even leading to false memories”.

    Though the results of this small experimental study involving US students are interesting, they're far from dramatic.

    Researchers were interested in investigating whether sleep deprivation has...

  • Umami flavouring 'may help you feel fuller faster'

    "Always hungry? You need more umami in your life: study finds so-called 'fifth taste' in sauces and meat helps us feel satisfied," reports the Mail Online.

    Umami is a Japanese term that roughly translates as "pleasant savoury taste" and has been described as the fifth taste, the other four being sweet, sour, bitter...

  • Study offers insight into genetics of schizophrenia

    "More than 100 schizophrenia genes have been pinpointed," reports the Daily Mail. In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers have gained further insights into the genetics of the condition, which it is hoped could lead to new treatments.

    Researchers have identified genetic differences at 108 positions in the...

  • Probiotics 'may improve blood pressure'

    “Eating probiotics may lower blood pressure,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    Probiotics, so-called “friendly bacteria”, have been found to moderately reduce blood pressure in a new study.

    The study is what is known as a systematic review, which is...

  • Worry over effectiveness of early HIV drugs

    "Early HIV drugs 'may not stop virus'," BBC News reports. The report is based on a study of HIV treatments in monkeys, and has been linked by the BBC to the emergence of HIV in a four-year-old girl thought to have been cured of the virus as the result of treatment from birth – the so-called "Mississippi girl".

    HIV...

  • Could new potential treatment mean safer IVF?

    “Dozen babies born using 'safer' IVF treatment,” reads today’s headline in The Independent.

    This headline was based on a new study providing proof of concept that the natural hormone kisspeptin-54 could be used to stimulate egg maturation in women requiring in vitro fertilisation (IVF).

    The modified IVF treatment on trial,...

  • Obese women may have 'food learning impairment'

    "Obese women show signs of food learning impairment," is the headline on the BBC News website.

    It reports on a behavioural study involving 67 individuals of normal weight and 68 obese individuals.

    Each participant was shown a series of either...

  • 'More adults should be taking statins,' says NICE

    "Doctors have been told to offer cholesterol-lowering statins to millions more people," BBC News reports.

    New guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommend lowering the bar for statin use in adults at risk...

  • Steroid asthma inhalers restrict children’s growth

    “Children who use inhalable steroids for asthma grow slower than their peers in the first year of taking the medication,” The Guardian reports. While this is an accurate report of the science, the effect found by researchers was small. On average, a reduction of around half a centimetre per year was seen, compared to children taking a...

  • Protein may help control diabetes symptoms

    "Diabetes could be cured 'in single jab'," is the misleading headline in the Daily Express. The news comes from an exciting new mouse study which found promising results for a treatment for type 2 diabetes.

    However, the study did not show that...

  • Owning a dog may make older adults fitter

    “Want to appear 10 years younger? Just buy a dog,” is the dubious claim on the Mail Online.

    A study has found a link between dog ownership and increased physical activity in older adults, but how this is linked to looking younger is unclear.

    Contrary to the headline, the study did not measure or mention physical appearance....

  • Prediabetes label unhelpful, experts argue

    “Pre-diabetes label ‘worthless’, researchers claim,” reports the BBC.

    The headline is based on an opinion piece published in the British Medical Journal (BMJ) by John Yudkin and Victor Montori, both of whom are professors of medicine.

    They argue that diagnosing people with “prediabetes” puts people at risk of unnecessary...

  • Study explores effect of plain cigarette packs

    "Long-term smokers find the taste of plain-packaged cigarettes worse than that of branded cigarettes," The Guardian reports.

    The news comes from Australian research into the impact of plain packaging and health risk warnings on packets of cigarettes and anti-smoking TV adverts.

    The researchers found highly emotive...

  • Spoons lead to inaccurate medicine doses for kids

    “Using a spoon to measure medicine for children can lead to potentially dangerous dosing mistakes,” the Daily Mail reports.

    Parents have long been instructed to provide liquid medication to their children in dosages measured using teaspoons and tablespoons. The rationale behind the advice is that this provides a quick and easy way for...

  • Sex addiction affects brain in 'same way as drugs'

    “Is compulsive sexual behaviour comparable to drug addiction?” asked The Guardian today.

    This and other related headlines came from a UK study that looked at brain scans of 19 men with compulsive sexual behaviour (CSB) while they watched either sexually explicit, erotic or non-sexual videos.

    CSB is a not a well-established...

  • 'Exercise may help prevent Alzheimer's disease'

    "Cut Alzheimer's risk by walking," the Daily Mail recommends. This advice is prompted by a statistical modelling study looking at population attributable risks (PARS) – factors known to influence the prevalence of a disease, such as Alzheimer's, ...

  • Offer weight loss surgery to diabetics, says NICE

    "An expansion of weight loss surgery in England is being proposed to tackle an epidemic of type 2 diabetes," BBC News reports. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended obese people with ...

  • Vasectomy-associated prostate cancer risk 'small'

    “Men who have the snip increase their risk of suffering fatal prostate cancer, according to research,” the Daily Mail reports. However, while the increase in risk was found to be statistically significant, it was small in absolute terms.

    The newspaper reports on a US study that followed 49,405 men over 24 years, a quarter of whom had...

  • Obesity link for siblings

    “Children are five times more likely to become obese if their older brother or sister is overweight,” reports the Daily Mail.

    There is a widespread assumption that a significant risk factor for child obesity is if they have one or both parents who are obese....

  • Malaria parasites can 'hide' inside bone marrow

    “Malaria parasites can hide inside the bone marrow and evade the body's defences, research confirms,” BBC News report.

    It is hoped that this insight into the activities of the parasites could lead to new treatments.

    While most people associate malaria...

  • Call to tackle maternal blood infection risk

    “Pregnant women and new mothers need closer attention for signs of potentially fatal sepsis, a study says,” reports BBC News.

    While still rare, sepsis – a blood infection – is now the leading cause of maternal death in the UK.

    Sepsis can...

  • Cycling linked to prostate cancer, but not infertility

    "Men who cycle more than nine hours a week are … more likely to develop prostate cancer," the Mail Online inaccurately reports. The story comes from the publication of an online survey into cycling in the UK and its effects on health outcomes.

    Researchers were particularly interested in whether frequent cycling was linked...

  • Gene mutation linked to distinct type of autism

    “Have scientists found the autism gene?" asks the Mail Online.

    The news is based on a genetic study that found children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) were more likely to have a mutation in a gene called CHD8 than children without...

  • Blood test for Alzheimer’s 'no better than coin toss'

    “Research in more than 1,000 people has identified a set of proteins in the blood which can predict the start of the dementia with 87% accuracy,” BBC News reports.

    The primary goal of the test was to predict whether people with mild cognitive impairments (usually age-related memory problems) would go on to develop “full-blown”...

  • Two-question test for alcohol misuse 'effective'

    “Do you regularly have more than six drinks in one sitting? Or do you regret a drunken escapade that took place in the past year? Answering yes to both questions may be a sign that you have a drink problem," the Mail Online reports.

    This comes...

  • Aggressive breast cancer protein discovered

    "A breakthrough by scientists could lead to a new treatment for one of the most aggressive forms of breast cancer," the Mail Online reports. Researchers have identified a protein called integrin αvβ6, which may help trigger the spread of some types of breast cancer.

    Up to a third of ...

  • Children’s TV contains unhealthy 'food cues'

    “Children are being bombarded with scenes of unhealthy eating on TV,” The Independent reports. Researchers looking at public broadcasting in the UK and Ireland have found that children’s TV contains a high number of visual and verbal references to unhealthy foods.

    In the UK, direct TV advertising of unhealthy food to children has been...

  • Headbanging could damage your (Motör)head

    “German doctors are highlighting the dangers of headbanging after a 50-year-old man developed bleeding in the brain following a Motörhead concert,” BBC News reports.

    The news is based on a case report in The Lancet about a man who developed a subdural haematoma.

    A ...

  • Lab-grown corneas could prevent blindness

     

    “Scientists regrow corneas in breakthrough that could pave the way for a cure for blindness,” reports the Mail Online.

    Researchers in the US have found a way to identify the stem cells that renew the cornea (the clear layer that covers the front of the eye), and have used them to grow normal corneas in mice.

    These...

  • Tests can predict teens most likely to binge drink

    “A single glass of wine or beer at the age of 14 can help a young teenager along the path to binge drinking,” the Daily Mail warns.

    But having a single drink does not mean a child is bound to become a “binge boozer”. That is just one of around 40 factors researchers have identified which they claim can be used to predict whether a...

  • Frozen testicle tissue produces mice offspring

    “A sample of frozen testicle has been used to produce live offspring in experiments on mice,” BBC News reports. 

    While this may seem like a strange study to conduct, the aim is to preserve the fertility of boys affected by childhood cancers such as...

  • Parents of autistic kids 'have autistic traits too'

    "Parents of children with autism are more likely to have autistic traits," the Mail Online reports. The news comes from research comparing the families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with those that are unaffected.

    ...

  • Facebook study guided users' emotions

    "Facebook made users depressed in secret research," the Mail Online reports. The news comes from a controversial experiment where researchers used the social networking site Facebook to explore the effects of "emotional contagion".

    Emotional contagion is when emotional states are transferred between people. For...

  • Kids who know their fast food logos 'grow up fat'

    “Children who recognise fast food brands are more likely to be obese,” the Mail Online reports.
    The headlines are based on a US study that included two separate samples of children aged three to five years; the first contained 69 children and the second contained 75.

    In both studies, the parents were questioned about their child...

  • 'Supercooling' may extend life of transplant organs

    BBC News reports on a new method to keep donated organs fresher for longer: “supercooling”.

    US researchers are developing a new technique for the longer term preservation of human organs before transplantation.

    Current methods of organ preservation can keep an organ viable for transplant up to around 12 hours once it has been...

  • Part of the brain for 'hangover guilt' identified

    "Scientists pinpoint the part of the brain that tells us 'never again'," the Mail Online reports. New research in rats suggests part of the brain called the lateral habenula (LHb) helps us learn lessons from bad experiences after consuming too much alcohol.

    The LHb is believed to play some role in preventing us repeating...

  • Blood test for breast cancer 'has potential'

    "Blood test could give early warning of breast cancer," The Guardian reports. Researchers have identified a genetic signature that may be useful in predicting whether a woman is likely to develop non-inherited breast cancer.

    ...

  • Moderate TV viewing linked to premature death

    “Watching TV for three hours a day can be deadly – doubling your risk of dying early,” the Mail Online reports.

    The website reports on a study involving a relatively large group of Spanish university graduates. The participants were asked to self-report time spent on three types of sedentary behaviour: TV viewing, computer use and...

  • Vitamin D deficiency linked to high blood pressure

    "Vitamin D supplements could help high blood pressure," The Independent reports. The paper reports on new research into genetic variations associated with low vitamin D levels and their relationship with blood pressure.

    Researchers pooled 35 studies of nearly 100,000 people with a European background. They found that the...

  • Give kids water not sugary fruit juice, parents advised

    “Ban all drinks but water from dinner table, parents told,” is the The Daily Telegraph's front page headline.

    Obviously, the government is unlikely to directly intervene in our diets in such a draconian way. In fact, the news in many of the papers has highlighted new advice and recommendations designed to reduce the nation’s sugar...

  • Casual sex can boost self-esteem

    “Casual sex IS good for self-esteem – but only if you're a 'physically strong, narcissistic male’,” says the Mail Online, somewhat inaccurately.

    The paper seems to have misread the results of this study of sexuality among US college students, which followed them over a nine-month period.

    The researchers were interested in three...

  • Teens could be given whooping cough booster

    “One in five children who see a doctor with a persistent cough may have…whooping cough, new research indicates,” The Independent reports. These findings have sparked calls for teenagers to be given a booster dose of the vaccine.

    Whooping cough (pertussis)...

  • Cannabis use 'genetically linked' to schizophrenia

    “Study finds people predisposed to the condition [schizophrenia’] and drug users share common genes,” the Mail Online reports. A new study suggests that ‘schizophrenia’ genes are associated with cannabis use.

    It has long been known that there is an association between cannabis use and schizophrenia – but the “direction of travel” has...

  • New pacemaker offers heart failure hope

    A new pacemaker which synchronises heart rate with breathing could "revolutionise" the lives of people with heart failure, The Daily Telegraph reports.

    Pacemakers are small electronic devices, implanted in the body, that help keep the heart beating regularly. They are normally used in people with conditions that disrupt the...

  • Menthol cigs 'encourage teens to smoke more'

    "Menthol cigarettes ARE more addictive," the Mail Online claims, based on a survey of 5,000 teenagers. The 2010-11 Canadian school survey found that 16% of teenagers aged 14 to 18 smoke cigarettes.

    The research found that teenagers who smoked menthol cigarettes were on average smoking around 60% more cigarettes than...

  • Pesticides linked to autistic disorders

    “Pregnant women who live near fields sprayed with pesticides can run more than three times the risk of having a child with autism,” the Mail Online reports.

    US researchers conducted a study that examined whether living in close proximity to where four common classes of agricultural pesticides were used whilst pregnant was associated...

  • Stress 'causes damage to the heart,' study finds

    "Stress is already known to be bad for the heart, but now scientists have discovered why it is so harmful," The Times reports.

    A new US study now offers a plausible model of how chronic psychological stress could lead to heart damage. It involved both mice and junior doctors.

    Researchers checked the blood of a small...

  • Pre-teen girls have 'easy access' to e-cigarettes

    “Children 'addicted to sweet tasting e-cigarettes',” is the alarmist headline in the Daily Mirror. A survey has found that a few pre-teen girls in Wales have experimented with the devices, but there is no evidence of widespread addiction.

    The headline is based on an opinion piece written by Kelly Evans, a Director of the organisation...

  • Sun tanning 'addictive' suggests study

    “Sunbathing 'may be addictive' warning,” BBC News reports.

    Researchers have investigated why, despite all the evidence of the harm it can cause (namely increased skin cancer risk), people continue to want a tan. Is it purely for aesthetic purposes,...

  • MMR jab unlikely to harm young babies

    A young couple's baby was given the MMR jab by mistake "potentially putting her life at risk", The Daily Telegraph website reports misleadingly.

    Giving a baby the wrong vaccine is a serious mistake; fortunately, the error was quickly noticed and the baby appears not to have been seriously harmed.

    Unfortunately, the...

  • Antidepressant suicide warnings 'backfired'

    “Antidepressant suicide warnings 'may have backfired’,'' BBC News reports.

    During 2003 and 2004, there were high-profile media reports in the US that children and adolescents who were prescribed antidepressants had an increased risk of suicidality (thoughts and attempts).

    This led the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which...

  • New weapon found in the war against superbugs

    "British university makes antibiotic resistance breakthrough," The Independent reports after new research found a method that could be used to attack the outer membrane of bacteria. This may help combat the threat of antibiotic resistance...

  • Key protein in childbirth contractions identified

    "Australian scientists discover protein that triggers child birth," the Mail Online reports. The protein (β-inhibitory protein) is thought to cause the uterus to contract and could possibly be used to induce labour in obese women.

    The website reports on a study looking at what causes the muscles of the...

  • Office screen work linked to dry eye syndrome

    “Staring at computer screens all day ‘changes your eyes’, scientists say,” is the headline in The Independent. This follows reports that people who stare at a computer screen experience changes in their tear fluid that are typical of the symptoms of dry eye syndrome (also known as dry eye disease).

    ...

  • Can a 'microwave helmet' really detect strokes?

    “Microwave helmet ‘can spot a stroke’,” reports BBC News.

    There are two types of stroke. The majority of strokes are caused by a clot stopping blood flow to an area of the brain. This type of stroke can be treated with anti-clotting medications to break up or dissolve blood clots. However, this type of treatment is disastrous if the...

  • Do doctors confuse ME with a heart problem?

    “ME: one third of patients ‘wrongly diagnosed’,” says The Daily Telegraph, which has reported on a new study of a condition called postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS).

    In PoTS, the heart rate increases by over 30 beats per minute when standing, causing dizziness, fatigue and other symptoms that impact a person’s quality of life (for a...

  • Warning issued over washing raw chicken

    "Don't wash chicken before cooking it, warns Food Standards Agency," The Guardian reports. The Food Standards Agency (FSA) has issued the advice as many people do not realise that washing raw poultry can spread bacteria, leading to an increased risk of ...

  • 'Bionic' pancreas could be used to treat diabetes

    “An artificial pancreas could allow thousands of diabetes patients to live normal lives,” the Mail Online reports.

    People with type 1 diabetes require lifelong insulin, as their body does not produce any. Insulin is a hormone that plays a key role in regulating the body’s blood sugar levels.

    In a new study, the safety and...

  • Hip replacement cement linked with deaths

    "Toxic NHS hip implants blamed for more than 40 deaths," The Daily Telegraph reports. Other media sources similarly report how surgical "cement" used in some hip replacements has been linked to the deaths.

    This news is based on a study looking at risk of death or severe harm associated with partial hip replacements...

  • Are 'career girl' lifestyle abortions on the rise?

    Media sources have reported on the "career girl" abortion (Daily Mail) or "lifestyle" abortion (The Daily Telegraph) after figures released by the Department of Health showed that increasing numbers of women aged 25 to 29, or who have long-term partners or children already, are having abortions.

    The media stories...

  • 'Super-mums' at risk of depression

    “’Super-mums’ … may be more likely to suffer from depression, researchers say,” the Mail Online reports. A US study found a possible association between concern about being perceived as a perfect parent and maternal depression risk.

    The researchers developed a 26-item questionnaire designed to assess what they described as “rigidity...

  • High-factor sunscreen doesn’t cut melanoma risk

    “High-factor sun cream cannot…protect against the deadliest form of skin cancer,” The Guardian reports. Research involving mice with a predisposition to develop melanoma found that sunscreen only delayed, rather than prevented, the onset of melanoma.

    ...

  • Making mosquitoes male may manage malaria

    "Mosquitoes modified to only give birth to males in bid to wipe out malaria," The Daily Telegraph reports after new research has found an innovative way of tackling the global problem of malaria.

    The technique used in this latest research is both brutal and elegant. Female mosquitoes, which spread ...

  • Red meat consumption linked to breast cancer

    “Eating a lot of red meat in early adult life may slightly increase the risk of breast cancer,” BBC News reports.

    The news is based on a large US study that looked at the protein dietary intake of almost 90,000 female nurses and their risk of breast cancer over a 20-year period.

    Previous studies have focused on the dietary...

  • Tomato extract effects exaggerated

    “Ketchup with everything: tomato sauce helps fight heart disease,” is the misleading headline in The Daily Telegraph.

    The headline follows a small study conducted into lycopene tablets, which involved 36 people with cardiovascular disease and 36 healthy volunteers. Lycopene is the pigment that gives tomatoes (and some other fruit and...

  • One in three adults in England 'has prediabetes'

    "One in three adults in England 'on cusp' of diabetes," BBC News and others report. The media reports are based on a study that estimated that 35.3% of adults in the UK now have prediabetes (also known as borderline diabetes).

    Prediabetes is where blood sugar levels are abnormally high, but lower than the threshold for...

  • Is obesity jab 'two years away'?

    “New obesity jab could be available within two years,” the Mail Online reports. The headline comes following news that scientists have identified a protein that may help stimulate the production of brown fat.

    Brown fat helps keep mammals warm. In humans, it is mostly found in newborn babies, who are particularly vulnerable to cold. As...

  • Cannabis can damage lives, researchers argue

    “Smoking marijuana as a teenager lowers IQ for life, scientists warn,” the Mail Online reports. The headline is prompted by a critical review looking at the evidence about the potential harms associated with cannabis use.

    This latest review was written by researchers from the US National Institute on Drug Abuse and provides an...

  • Sleep 'promotes memory-related brain changes'

    "The mechanism by which a good night's sleep improves learning and memory has been discovered by scientists," is the somewhat overeager reporting on the BBC News website. While the study had intriguing results, it only involved mice.

    This study in mice looked at if and how sleep helps memory and learning. The researchers got...

  • 5:2 diet style an 'immune booster,' study finds

    “Fasting for at least two days regenerates immune systems damaged by ageing or cancer treatment, research has shown,” the Daily Express reports. However, the study that is being reported on only involved mice, not humans.

    Prolonged or intermittent fasting has become an increasingly popular strategy to achieve weight loss. This has...

  • Three-person IVF in 'two years'

    "Scientists will be ready to create babies from three people in around two years, if it is made legal," BBC News reports. The UK fertility regulator, the 

    The main conclusion of the review is that the proposed techniques appear to be safe, but there are still a number of experiments that should be performed before treatments are...

  • Air pollution linked to irregular heartbeat and lung blood clots

    "Air pollution is linked to increased risk of developing an irregular heartbeat and blood clots in the lung," BBC News reports.

    A large study found that short-term exposure to small particulate matter – a form of air pollution linked to cars and other sources – was linked to a raised risk of death from these conditions....

  • Cannabis and sunshine may damage sperm quality

    ''Cannabis doubles younger men's risk of infertility, study finds,'' reports The Independent. The same study also found a drop in sperm quality during the summer months.

    The paper reported on the results of a study that saw men attending fertility clinics, looking at the effects of lifestyle on one element of male fertility – known as...

  • 'Male hormones' in womb linked to autism

    “Boys who develop autism may be exposed to higher levels of hormones…in the womb,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), commonly known as autism, is more common in males, but the reason why is still unknown. One hypothesis is that there may be factors in the development of male infants that increase their...

  • Centenarians are outliving 'lifestyle' diseases

    "Centenarians have found a way to beat the common diseases of old age," BBC News reports. A UK study found that the over-100s are less likely to die of diseases associated with lifestyle and more likely to die from infections such as pneumonia.

    Over a 10-year period, researchers examined trends in outcomes for centenarians...

  • Just five sunburns increase your cancer risk

    “Five serious sunburns increase the risk of deadly skin cancer by 80%,” The Daily Telegraph reports. A US study has found that sun overexposure during the teenage years significantly increases the risk of developing skin cancer in later life.

    The study followed over 110,000 nurses over 20 years, using questionnaires.

    It found...

  • Learning second language 'slows brain ageing'

    "Learning a second language can have a positive effect on the brain," BBC News reports after a Scottish study found that participants who spoke two or more languages tended to perform better in intelligence tests than people who only spoke English.

    The researchers looked at a group of 853 people who had been given...

  • Breast cancer gene and smoking is a 'lethal mix'

    "Smoking and the breast cancer risk gene BRCA2 combine to 'enormously' increase the chance of developing lung cancer," BBC News reports.

    The BRCA2 gene, which is known to increase ...

  • You can train a toddler to eat veggies, study claims

    “Children can learn to eat new vegetables if they are introduced regularly before the age of two,” BBC News reports. A new study suggests that the key is to introduce them 'early and often'.

    The challenge of introducing vegetables into a child’s diet is that some toddlers, as their parents will testify, are...

  • Is sleeping in a light room linked to obesity?

    "Sleeping in a room with too much light has been linked to an increased risk of piling on the pounds," BBC News reports. The news comes from a study that assessed self-reported sleeping habits and body weight measurements in a group of women at a single point in time.

    The researchers did find a significant link between...

  • Watching porn associated with male brain shrinkage

    “Viewing porn shrinks the brain,” reports the Daily Mail.

    In a small study, MRI scans found that men who watched the most pornography had less grey matter – complex brain tissue – compared to men who watched the least.

    It found a weak to moderate correlation between the number of hours of porn viewed a week and smaller and...

  • Lasers used to regenerate damaged teeth

    "Lasers have been used to regenerate parts of damaged teeth," BBC News reports. The hope is that laser therapy could one day replace lengthy and expensive dental operations such as root canal treatments.

    A new laboratory study has found that low-power laser therapy can stimulate dental stem cells (cells that have the ability...

  • FTO 'fat gene' may make people more impulsive

    "Carriers of the FTO gene are more likely to succumb to impulsive hunger pangs and prefer high-calorie foods," the Mail Online reports.

    A study of carriers of a variant of the FTO gene found reduced activity in areas of the brain associated with impulse control. This was associated with changes in weight, brain function,...

  • Wikipedia 'not a reliable source' of health advice

    "Don't use Wikipedia for medical advice," warns The Independent after a survey found factual errors in 9 out of 10 articles about the 10 most common medical conditions.

    This story is based on a study that assessed the information in Wikipedia articles on 10 common conditions, including depression, back pain and high blood...

  • NICE: 'Obese should be prescribed slimming clubs'

    “GPs told to prescribe £100 slimming courses for millions of obese patients,” the Daily Mail reports.

    The news is based on new guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) that aim to encourage sustainable weight loss in the obese; “lose a little, and keep it off”.

    The guidance is mainly aimed...

  • Free radicals may actually be good for us

    “Antioxidant … supplements may make our bodies age faster,” the Mail Online reports. New research suggests that oxygen containing free radicals – the molecules that antioxidants are designed to target – may actually help cells live longer.

    Antioxidants are a type of molecule that can neutralise  free radicals, which are a type of...

  • Could an MS drug 'erase' traumatic memories?

    "A drug could be re-purposed to erase painful memories from people who have suffered trauma and pain," The Independent reports. The news comes from a study involving mice which measured their response to a series of electric shocks.

    The mice were either fed the drug...

  • Fresh hope in hunt for malaria vaccine

    “A group of children… naturally immune to malaria are helping scientists to develop a new vaccine,” BBC News reports.

    Researchers hope the children could be key to developing a viable vaccine for malaria, which kills more than half a million people every year...

  • Could a compound found in cannabis treat epilepsy?

    "Cannabis could be used to help treat epilepsy," the Mail Online reports. A leading epilepsy medical journal has published a critical review summarising the evidence of the benefits of cannabis – specifically the compound cannabidiols – in preventing seizures. The review highlighted one thing: the evidence does not point to any...

  • Premature ejaculation 'doesn't just upset men'

    "Women suffer during premature ejaculation too," the Mail Online reports after a new study has assessed the psychological impact of premature ejaculation on women and how this may influence their perception of their relationship.

    The website reports on a survey that investigated a group of almost 1,500 women aged 20 to 50...

  • Pets can carry the MRSA superbug

    "Pets can harbour the hospital superbug MRSA and it can pass between pets and their owners," BBC News reports.

    New research suggests that as many as 9% of dogs may be carriers, though the risk of transmission is small.

    The story comes from a laboratory study which found that cats and dogs can carry the same genetic...

  • Prostate cancer linked to common STI

    “Prostate cancer could be a sexually transmitted disease caused by a common infection,” The Independent reports.

    Researchers have found evidence of a link between the cancer and trichomoniasis – a common parasite that is passed on during unprotected sexual contact.

    A laboratory study found the parasite produces a protein...

  • E-cigs 'better than patches and gum' as quitting aid

    “E-cigarettes more effective than patches to help quit smoking, says study,” The Guardian reports. A UK study has found that people who use the aids are 60% more likely to quit than those who try nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) patches or gum, or willpower alone.

    This was a “real world” study that surveyed a representative sample of...

  • Vaccines 'not linked with autism,' study finds

    "There is no evidence whatsoever linking the development of autism to childhood vaccines," The Guardian reports.

    A new study involving more than a million children found no evidence of a link between childhood vaccines and autism or ...

  • Study discovers secret of the Mediterranean diet

    “The combination of olive oil and leafy salad or vegetables is what gives the Mediterranean diet its healthy edge,” BBC News reports.

    The Mediterranean diet – a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, beans, whole grains, olive oil and fish – has long...

  • Could a single binge drink harm your health?

    “Four glasses of wine is enough to harm your health, scientists say,” reports The Independent. A study has found that just a small amount of alcohol can cause harmful bacteria to leak from the gut into the blood.

    The research aimed to see whether binge drinking affects the ease that bacterial substances move through the lining of the...

  • Scientists predict dengue risk for Brazil World Cup

    "Scientists have developed an 'early warning system' to alert authorities to the risk of dengue fever outbreaks in Brazil during the World Cup," BBC News reports.

    England fans planning to travel to Brazil are being warned about the risk of dengue fever after Brazilian researchers have developed a statistical model based on...

  • Measles virus used to treat bone marrow cancer

    “Massive dose of measles virus kills cancer cells,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    The paper has reported on a new study in the growing field of virotherapy – a treatment where viruses are used to attack diseases.

    The study was a proof of concept study, involving people with...

  • Two big meals 'better' than six snacks for diabetics

    “Only eating breakfast and lunch may be more effective at managing type 2 diabetes than eating smaller, more regular meals,” BBC News reports.

    The report focuses on a small study which found that when people with type 2 diabetes ate two meals a day they lost more weight and had lower blood sugar levels at the end of 12 weeks than...

  • Audit of NHS care for the dying published

    “Thousands of patients are “dying badly” in NHS hospitals every year,” The Independent reports. An audit, carried out by the Royal College of Physicians, found some NHS trusts are failing to adhere to agreed guidelines on palliative care.

    Other problems, identified by the audit, and picked up by the media include “Sick and elderly...

  • Audit of NHS care for the dying published

    “Thousands of patients are “dying badly” in NHS hospitals every year,” The Independent reports. An audit, carried out by the Royal College of Physicians, found some NHS trusts are failing to adhere to agreed guidelines on palliative care.

    Other problems, identified by the audit, and picked up by the media include “Sick and elderly...

  • Brits eating too much salt, sugar and fat

    “Too much sugar, salt and fat: healthy eating still eluding many Britons,” The Guardian reports, while the Daily Mail rather bizarrely warns of a “fruit juice timebomb”. Both papers are covering a major survey that looked at the nation’s eating habits over recent years.

    The survey found that, overall, adults and children are eating too...

  • Brits eating too much salt, sugar and fat

    “Too much sugar, salt and fat: healthy eating still eluding many Britons,” The Guardian reports, while the Daily Mail rather bizarrely warns of a “fruit juice timebomb”. Both papers are covering a major survey that looked at the nation’s eating habits over recent years.

    The survey found that, overall, adults and children are eating too...

  • Study linking brain cancer and mobiles inconclusive

    “Intensive mobile phone users at higher risk of brain cancers, says study,” The Guardian reports.

    The news is based on a French study which identified 447 adults who were diagnosed with the most common types of brain tumour (meningiomas or gliomas) between 2004 and 2006. It matched them with 892 people who hadn’t been diagnosed with...

  • Study linking brain cancer and mobiles inconclusive

    “Intensive mobile phone users at higher risk of brain cancers, says study,” The Guardian reports.

    The news is based on a French study which identified 447 adults who were diagnosed with the most common types of brain tumour (meningiomas or gliomas) between 2004 and 2006. It matched them with 892 people who hadn’t been diagnosed with...

  • People with purpose in life 'live longer,' study advises

    "Sense of purpose 'adds years to life'," BBC News reports, after a new study found that having a purpose in life is linked to living longer, regardless of your age or retirement status. But this weak study can only show an association at best.

    The US study asked more than 6,000 people aged 20 to 70 whether they felt they had...

  • People with purpose in life 'live longer,' study advises

    "Sense of purpose 'adds years to life'," BBC News reports, after a new study found that having a purpose in life is linked to living longer, regardless of your age or retirement status. But this weak study can only show an association at best.

    The US study asked more than 6,000 people aged 20 to 70 whether they felt they had...

  • New advice encourages more home births

    "More women should give birth at home, advice suggests," reports The Guardian after draft guidelines produced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommended that women with a low risk of complications in childbirth should be encouraged to either give birth at home...

  • New advice encourages more home births

    "More women should give birth at home, advice suggests," reports The Guardian after draft guidelines produced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommended that women with a low risk of complications in childbirth should be encouraged to either give birth at home...

  • Resveratrol's health benefits ‘overstated’

    “Red wine health benefits 'overhyped',” BBC News reports. The headline follows a study researching the chemical resveratrol, which is found in red wine and chocolate.

    Reveratrol has been reported to have long-term health benefits, such as anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. There has been speculation that it may be responsible...

  • Resveratrol's health benefits 'overstated'

    “Red wine health benefits 'overhyped',” BBC News reports. The headline follows a study researching the chemical resveratrol, which is found in red wine and chocolate.

    Reveratrol has been reported to have long-term health benefits, such as anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. There has been speculation that it may be responsible...

  • Four rare diseases added to newborn screening

    "Newborn babies to be tested for rare diseases," reports BBC News online.

    The news is based on an announcement by the UK's National Screening Committee (NSC), which has recommended screening every newborn baby in the UK for four additional genetic disorders as part of the...

  • Four rare diseases added to newborn screening

    "Newborn babies to be tested for rare diseases," reports BBC News online.

    The news is based on an announcement by the UK's National Screening Committee (NSC), which has recommended screening every newborn baby in the UK for four additional genetic disorders as part of the...

  • Electrical brain stimulation may induce dream control

    “Scientists induce lucid dreams by adding current to sleeping people's brains,” reports the Mail Online.

    This headline comes from a study of 27 people indicating that for some, electrical stimulation of the brain at a specific wavelength (25 Hz to 40 Hz) may increase the lucidity of their dreams and their self-awareness during them...

  • Electrical brain stimulation may induce dream control

    “Scientists induce lucid dreams by adding current to sleeping people's brains,” reports the Mail Online.

    This headline comes from a study of 27 people indicating that for some, electrical stimulation of the brain at a specific wavelength (25 Hz to 40 Hz) may increase the lucidity of their dreams and their self-awareness during them...

  • Fat shaming 'more damaging than racism'

    “Fat shaming can have a much worse impact on mental and physical health than racism or sexism,” the Mail Online reports, describing “fat shaming” as discrimination against those who are overweight.

    In fact, the science behind the headline suggests that all forms of discrimination have a negative impact, although some more so than...

  • Fat shaming 'more damaging than racism'

    “Fat shaming can have a much worse impact on mental and physical health than racism or sexism,” the Mail Online reports, describing “fat shaming” as discrimination against those who are overweight.

    In fact, the science behind the headline suggests that all forms of discrimination have a negative impact, although some more so than...

  • Lack of exercise 'highest risk' for women over 30

    "Heart disease warning: Lack of exercise is worse risk for over-30s women than smoking or obesity," The Independent reports. It is important to stress that this headline is based on a result that is applicable to a population, not to an individual.

    The Australian study the headline is reporting on looked at population...

  • Lack of exercise 'highest risk' for women over 30

    "Heart disease warning: Lack of exercise is worse risk for over-30s women than smoking or obesity," The Independent reports. It is important to stress that this headline is based on a result that is applicable to a population, not to an individual.

    The Australian study the headline is reporting on looked at population...

  • Claims that men are being 'nagged to death' inflated

    “Nagging could drive men to an early grave, study suggests,” The Independent reports. A Danish study found that both sexes were adversely affected by constant nagging, but men seemed to be more vulnerable.

    A cohort study was conducted with the aim of evaluating the association between stressful social relations and death from any...

  • ONS suggests that one in four deaths are 'avoidable'

    “1 in 4 deaths could have been prevented,” The Times reports. Figures released by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) found that 23% of deaths could have been prevented through better care, more effective treatment and healthier living.

    The news is based on an ONS bulletin titled ‘...

  • Early menopause linked to mental decline

    “Premature menopause is linked with poor thinking and reaction times,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    A large French study found that women who had their menopause before the age of 40 had memory problems and delayed reaction times.

    Premature menopause is usually defined as occurring before or around the age of 40. This can...

  • Breastfeeding 'cuts childhood asthma risk'

    “Breastfeeding DOES cut the risk of asthma, says landmark study of 250,000 babies over 30 years,” the Mail Online reports. A major review has found a link between breastfeeding and reduced childhood asthma rates.  

    The headlines follow a large review of the link between breastfeeding and the risk of asthma in children from the general...

  • Eczema may help protect against skin cancer

    "Eczema may reduce risk of skin cancer: Condition means sufferers are more likely to shed skin containing cancerous cells," reports the Mail Online.

    This headline follows a study which found that mice with a defect in their skin barrier were less likely to develop benign skin tumours. But the mice that did develop tumours...

  • Asthma is still a 'killer,' report warns

    Health news today is dominated by the news that, as The Daily Telegraph reports, two in three asthma deaths "could have been prevented". The Daily Mail says that half of those who died were given the wrong medication.

    The headlines follow the publication of a confidential enquiry report by the ...

  • Could young blood 'slow' ageing?

    “Vampire treatment with young blood reverses ageing process,” The Independent reports. But before you get too excited, we should clarify that the headlines relate to a study on mice.

    The research involved connecting the circulation of young and aged mice, to discover how this affected the area of the brain involved with learning and...

  • Could watching TV be making you stressed?

    "Stress can be transmitted through TV screen," The Daily Telegraph's website reports. The site's report uses an image from hit US TV series "Breaking Bad" to imply that box-set binges may not be good for your stress levels. But the study in question involved real people, not fictional characters.

    Researchers...

  • Study suggests 'smacking children doesn't work'

    "Parents smack their children more than they admit – and it DOESN'T improve behaviour,” the Mail Online reports.

    The news is based on a study that examined the use of “corporal punishment” by 33 families in the US, with children aged between two and five years old. It used audio recordings to verify the use of corporal punishment...

  • Casual cocaine users may be risking heart damage

    "Even 'social' cocaine users are doing catastrophic damage to their hearts," the Mail Online reports after an Australian study found that casual cocaine use was associated with heart damage.

    Most previous research into the effects of the illegal stimulant has involved people recruited through drug treatment centres. As the...

  • WHO warns about threat of drug resistance

    “WHO calls for urgent action to preserve power of antibiotics and make new ones,” The Guardian reports. The World Health Organization (WHO), has published a report highlighting the growing global threat of drug resistance.

    Expert opinions on the implications of the WHO report have been informative, such as the quote, on BBC News, from...

  • Could a carbohydrate curb calorific cravings?

    “Pill to switch off hunger possible as 'anti-appetite' molecule discovered,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    The news is based on a study of fermentable carbohydrates (these aren’t easily digested, but can be used by bacteria in the colon of humans and mice). 

    Researchers fed mice a high-fat diet supplemented with inulin or...

  • Heart attack survivors 'gain from high-fibre diet'

    "If you have had a heart attack, eat plenty of fibre," is the advice on the BBC News website. A US study has found that in a group of people who'd had heart attacks, those who ate a high-fibre diet were less likely to die than those who didn't.

    This was a large long-term study using data from health professionals who'd had a...

  • Is marriage a recipe for 'trouble and strife'?

    "Being married can make you depressed, study finds," The Independent reports. Perhaps a more accurate summary of the research the paper reports on is "being unhappily married is associated with different responses to positive pictures" (admittedly, not such a catchy headline).

    The study involved married and...

  • Mice 'less stressed' around women

    "Eek! Why mice are unafraid of women,” is the bizarre and not entirely accurate headline in The Daily Telegraph today. The Telegraph and other papers have reported on a lab study that suggests “man smell” may cause a much higher stress response in mice than the smell of women.

    If these findings are accurate, and the presence of...

  • Non-smokers shunning e-cigarettes

    “E-cigarette users have tripled to 2 million since 2012,” The Guardian reports. This is just one of the findings from a survey by anti-tobacco public health charity Action on Smoking and Health (ASH). It also showed there is little evidence that non-smokers are using e-cigarettes, although this could change in the future.

    These...

  • Does fat 'disappear' into thin air?

    “It really is thin air! Living in a high-altitude city nearly halves your risk of being obese,” the Mail Online reports.

    A study looking at the US armed forces found that people in high altitude areas such as Colorado were less likely to go from overweight to obese...

  • Upping coffee intake may reduce diabetes risk

    "Three cups of coffee a day could help keep diabetes away," The Independent reports. A US study has found a link between increased coffee intake and a small – but significant – reduction in type 2 diabetes risk, but not proof that drinking coffee prevents diabetes.

    The study found that adults who increased their coffee...

  • Dog bite hospitalisations highest in deprived areas

    “Hospital admissions for dog bites are three times as high in the most deprived areas of England as in the least,” BBC News reports. Official data released today shows a striking correlation between deprivation and dog bite injuries.

    Many health journalists also sunk their teeth into statistics that showed a 6% rise in dog bites on...

  • Can mental trauma be passed on through sperm?

    "Traumatic experiences can be inherited, as major shocks alter how cells in the body work," The Daily Telegraph reports.

    But before you start blaming Mum and Dad for your problems, the research it reports on only involved mice.

    The study looked at how traumatic stress in the early life of male mice influenced the...

  • Lung and pancreatic cancers may be on the rise

    "Lung cancer will soon become the biggest cancer killer among women," the Mail Online reports, while ITV News reveals that pancreatic cancer "poses [a] growing threat". Both headlines are prompted by a study that has estimated future cancer trends across the EU.

    The researchers estimate there will be approximately...

  • Kidney injuries 'killings thousands', study claims

    “Failures in basic hospital care are resulting in more than 1,000 deaths a month from … acute kidney injury,” The Independent reports. A study commissioned by the NHS estimates that up to 40,000 people may be dying from this preventable condition.

    The study aimed to discover the prevalence of acute kidney injury (AKI – previously...

  • Edible flowers not proven to prevent cancer

    “Eating flowers grown in British gardens could help to reduce the risk of heart disease and cancer, according to a new study,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    However, the study the news is based on did not actually involve any humans.

    So while the flowers may be edible, claims they prevent cancer are unproven.

    The study...

  • Cheap holidays 'increased' melanoma rates

    “Skin cancer rates ‘surge since 1970s’,” reports the BBC.

    The news is based on a press release from Cancer Research UK after the release of new figures for the number of people diagnosed with malignant melanoma, the most serious form of skin cancer. The statistics show that the number of people being diagnosed with malignant melanoma...

  • 'Silver surfers' may have lower depression risk

    "Silver surfers are happier than techno-foges [sic]: Internet use cuts elderly depression rates by 30 per cent," the Mail Online reports after the results of a US study have suggested that regular internet use may help combat feelings of isolation and depression in older adults.

    In this study, 3,075 retired people were...

  • Apathy unproven as early warning sign of dementia

    “Elderly who lose interest in pastimes could be at risk of Alzheimer's,” reports The Daily Telegraph, with other papers reporting similar headlines.

    These incorrect headlines are based on the results of a study that looked for a link between symptoms of apathy and structural brain changes (on brain scans) in over 4,000 older adults who...

  • NICE highlights how hand washing can save lives

    “Doctors and nurses should do more to stop hospital patients developing infections, an NHS watchdog says,” BBC News reports.

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has highlighted how basic hygiene protocols, such as hand washing, may be overlooked...

  • PET scans may improve brain injury diagnosis

    “PET scans could predict extent of recovery from brain injury, trials show,” The Guardian reports. Evidence suggests that the advanced scanning devices may be able to detect faint signs of consciousness in people with severe brain injuries.

    The paper reports on a study that examined how accurate two specialised brain imaging techniques...

  • Cannabis linked to brain differences in the young

    “Using cannabis just once a week harms young brains,” the Daily Mail reports.

    The newspaper reports on an US study that took one-off brain MRI scans of a group of 20 young adult recreational cannabis users, and a comparison group of 20 non-users. They compared their brain structure, focusing on regions that are believed to be...

  • Eating chocolate probably won't save your marriage

    “As blood glucose levels plummet, aggression levels rise, and people take it out on those closest to them,” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    This news is based on an American study into blood glucoses levels and aggression.

    Researchers aimed to find out whether people’s blood glucose levels predicted aggressive impulses and...

  • Salt cuts have 'saved lives,' says study

    "Cutting back on salt does save lives," is the good news on the front page of the Daily Mail. The headline is based on a study of data obtained from the Health Survey for England, the National Diet and Nutrition Survey, and the Office for National Statistics between 2003 and 2011.

    The researchers chose 2003 as the start...

  • New hepatitis C drug treatment 'shows promise'

    "A new treatment for hepatitis C 'cured' 90% of patients with the infection in 12 weeks, scientists said," BBC News reports after a new drug protocol designed to target the protein that assists the spread of the virus through the body has shown promising results.

    The study the BBC reports on involved 394 people with...

  • Could statins also protect against dementia?

    “Heart pills taken by millions of people in Britain could dramatically reduce the risk of dementia,” the Daily Express reports.

    A study from Taiwan has found an association between the use of statins (cholesterol-lowering drugs) and reduced dementia risk.

    In this large study of older adults, researchers recorded people’s first...

  • No way to reliably identify low-risk prostate cancer

    “Men with prostate cancer being given 'false hope',” The Daily Telegraph reports.

    UK researchers have examined the accuracy of different methods that have sometimes been used (mostly outside the UK) to identify “clinically insignificant” prostate cancers – those that would not be expected to affect a man during his lifetime (meaning...

  • Lab-grown vaginas successfully implanted

    "Doctors implant lab-grown vagina" is the headline on the BBC News website, reporting on the latest breakthrough in the increasingly exciting field of tissue engineering.

    In this latest study, tissue engineering was used to develop a vagina for reconstructive surgery in four teenage girls who had the rare condition Mayer-...

  • Removing copper from body could slow cancer

    "Copper can block growth of rare cancer," is the rather unclear headline in The Daily Telegraph. Researchers have found that a drug that reduces the amount of copper in the body may also be able to lessen the growth of some kinds of tumours.

    These tumours – such as melanoma – have a mutation in the BRAF gene. BRAF helps...

  • Effectiveness of Tamiflu and Relenza questioned

    “Ministers blew £650 MILLION on useless anti-flu drugs,” the Daily Mail reports. The paper cites a large study, which investigated the effectiveness of the antiviral drugs Tamiflu (oseltamivir) and Relenza (zanamivir).

    These drugs, called neuraminidase inhibitors, have been stockpiled in many countries, including the UK, to prevent...

  • Home HIV testing kits now legal in UK

    “Kits allowing people to test themselves for HIV at home can be bought over the counter in the UK for the first time,” BBC News recently reported.

    The UK government has amended the law so “do it yourself” home testing kits for HIV are now legal to be sold over-the-counter.

     

    Can go I out and buy a test?

    ...

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